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NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • For a great example of a DSL that doesn't follow your "only declarative" rule is VoiceXML, which is absolutely a DSL.

    If contains a sort of odd mix of declarative structures, mixed in with bits and pieces of logic ...

    While I personally HATE this whole "XML as code" idea, in VoiceXML it works wonderfully.

    Go read up on it, any study of DSLs is incomplete in my opinion without understanding VoiceXML.
    • For a great example of a DSL that doesn't follow your "only declarative" rule is VoiceXML, which is absolutely a DSL.

      Good point.

      "Purely declarative" is a red herring. The question is whether the language is general purpose or domain specific. Ruby (and Ruby APIs) are general purpose. That's sort of the point of a general purpose language: to allow you to write domain specific APIs. (Thank The DHH that his followers delivered us from such mundanity.)

      In the same way, XML exists as a tool to descri