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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • Hi, thanks for coming.

    I'm not a sysadmin, so I wouldn't say that's what the talk was about. The example I had was about batch processing, and the algorithms I managed to cover were about number crunching.

    What is your definition of "application"? GUI? There is indeed a dichotomy between threads and forks - because programming for them is so different, and most of our thinking (not to mention our tools) has centered on linear programs which plod through their task. Asynchronous code is a somewhat different topic than parallelism, but certainly an important one in interactive applications.

    This talk (if the title wasn't obvious) was about adding a fork() into that rather typical style of programming without needing to completely rewrite your code. It isn't intended as a howto, but I hope it gave you something to think about WRT threads even. Perhaps I needed some better example code or just a more refined presentation?