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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • I can't swear it handles dependencies the way you want, but have you tried the CPAN.pm "autobundle" command?

    $ oldperl -MCPAN -e shell

    cpan> autobundle
    ...
    Wrote bundle file
        /home/david/.cpan/Bundle/Snapshot_2009_08_03_00.pm

    cpan> quit

    $ newperl -MCPAN -e shell

    cpan> install Bundle::Snapshot_2009_03_03_00

    ... wait a long time ...

    -- dagolden [dagolden.com]

    • Autobundle is inadequate for this. It installs the latest version of a distro, not the one you have installed.

      • Actually, I don't have that concern - I want the latest working version. When I upgrade, I bite the bullet and upgrade.

        Of course, CPAN.pm won't give me that; it'll give me the latest version, worky or not. But that's an issue with CPAN.pm, not autobundle.

        autobundle will also install everything that was installed before, even if some of them were installed only because they were dependencies of one of the modules specifically requested before, even though that module no longer depends upon them. I don't think one can get around that problem without getting the information to make the bundle from the install process, rather than just checking to see what is installed.