Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments
NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
 Full
 Abbreviated
 Hidden
More | Login | Reply
Loading... please wait.
  • We (government agencies) are not bound by the ADA, but rather the Rehabilitation Act and Section 508 [section508.gov] of the Workforce Reinvestment Act. What that means, is that my sites have to be accessible to persons with disabilities and I can follow the letter of the law by adhering to the standards of 508. Of course, I can still follow those standards and develop a completely inaccessible site. Depends whose disabilities we're talking about (but that's another rant). The law primarily addresses visual disabilities.

    Now courts have begun looking at suits filed under 508 and ADA with respect to web sites. The courts have differing opinions, but Southwest won an ADA suit with the judge ruling that a web site is not a place of public accomodation as specifically layed out by the ADA. But you gottta wonder why on Earth SWA doesn't want an accessible site. They were sued by visually impaired persons. Way to go - alienating customers.

    Personally,I would *never* develop a site that required the user to have a particular browser. I would consider that a biased endorsement and fundamentally wrong, both as a fed and as a web designer. While I no longer support Netscape 4 in my development (can you blame me?), I certainly support later versions of NS, Mozilla, Safari, IE, and anything else I can test with.