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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • I've used most of those (PeopleTools, I don't know), but I definitely wouldn't put them on a resume; because I don't think I know enough.

    Is that person implying frequent use or familiarity ? Passing "I've seen what this looks like, read some code, fiddled with it" type answers are certainly possible.. Developer level, I-dont-need-no-stinking-reference-manual type knowledge.. ? umm, wow.

    • by Whammo (2555) on 2004.04.07 17:30 (#29948) Homepage Journal

      That's why I extend linguistical concepts to my resumé, based on my (perceived) ability to read (understand) and write (produce) some technology: fluent, literate, conversant, and familiar.

      Most interviewers have commented favorably on that approach, although I have had to explain it more often than not.

      • I think I'm going to steal that idea. I split my skills into similar categories, they just didn't sound as impressive. I still think I need an extra category for "acronyms beginning with 'X' I call bullshit my way through", is there a proper linguistical term for that?
        • I still think I need an extra category for "acronyms beginning with 'X' I call bullshit my way through", is there a proper linguistical term for that?

          Just mark that down as "fluent", just like the next guy.

          --
          • Randal L. Schwartz
          • Stonehenge