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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • Which is possibly why I seem to clash so often with chromatic...

    I dunno... I've taken the equivalent of three large novels worth of notes for the Perl 6 design over the past year (and I've written a novel and a half, so I know how much that is), helped quadruple the number of tests for the Perl core, and written a fair few articles here and there.

    I've not done as much work as some people, and I'll never claim that I have, but I don't consider myself as having sat on the sidelines.

    • Most of the clashing I'm referring to in that line is in years past (2005 plus or minus whatever) not in recent times.

      I've been hugely impressed by the efforts you've made on Perl 6.
      • It seems more likely to me that meeting in person moderated our expectations of each other.

  • And I'm naturally suspicious of, biased against, and aggressive towards, people that talk out of proportion with they amount that they DO.

    Which is possibly why I seem to clash so often with chromatic :)

    Perhaps chromatic was doing his job [perl.com] which seems to me it would require much talking. And perhaps he was just not talking about the other stuff he was doing (see chromatics response above). Some people are more naturally included towards self-promotion then others, it might be wise if you looked a li

    • > Perhaps chromatic was doing his job which seems to me it would require much talking... Some people are more naturally included towards self-promotion then others.

      Then consider me suspicious of people that choose to do that sort of job (opine, not just report)... and of people that are naturally inclined towards self-promotion.

      But I'm quite fine with successful people that both talk and play a big game.
  • So we either get a useful new language, or we get a Paul Graham with better insight on his areas of fallibility and (hopefully) greater humility and less of a tendency to make bold untestable statements.

    Doubt it. It seemed to me that he was full of himself, or had a lot of time on his hands, because he made a million dollars a few years ago.

    • So we either get a useful new language, or we get a Paul Graham with better insight on his areas of fallibility and (hopefully) greater humility and less of a tendency to make bold untestable statements.

      Doubt it. It seemed to me that he was full of himself, or had a lot of time on his hands, because he made a million dollars a few years ago.

      > It seemed to me that he was full of himself, or had a lot of time on his hands, because he made a million dollars a few years ago.

      That gives him some leeway to talk about making a million dollars, but then he's only done it once as far as I'm aware (could be wrong).

      If he can predict (invest) in a new startup and get it right again, then I get impressed.

      I still think it doesn't qualify him to talk about analogies between hackers and painters (unless he's a painter too, which he may well be).

      • Methinks you need to read this [idlewords.com].

      • If he can predict (invest) in a new startup and get it right again, then I get impressed.

        You know that that’s exactly what he’s been doing for the past couple of years, right? He’s been leading a startup incubator company called Y Combinator that have funded a couple of suitably successful (and of course, as is the nature of such things, a correspondingly large array of failed startups).

        He is doing – it’s just that his sphere of “doing” is different from the d

  • I pity the people who, perhaps thru faulty judgment or having someone misrepresent Graham, spend time investigating Arc, only to find it's a waste of time. I'm not worried about those who realize clearly what sort of risk they are undertaking.
  • And I'm naturally suspicious of, biased against, and aggressive towards, people that talk out of proportion with they amount that they DO.

    Which is possibly why I seem to clash so often with chromatic :)
    The chromatic I know you can barely get a word out of him. When you do, it's sarcasm anyway. :P That mean he does a whole lot?
  • I've been bitten too many times by problems with CSS layout compatibility issues, and I find it an amusing double standard that GTK packing boxes are "good" but what amounts to HTML packing boxes (albeit also ones that can be used to display tabular data) are "bad".

    Because the one's a document and the other is a GUI. If I wanted to display a document, I wouldn't use GTKs box model. That's like back in the old days when we just crammed huge texts into VB dialog boxes. If I wanted to display any kind of doc

    --
    Ordinary morality is for ordinary people. -- Aleister Crowley
  • (God only knows what we'd use build_requires: perl: for, but it does give us consistency across the dependency specification)

    I think cross-compilation can be one example of such uses. Imagine a distribution which may use a later perl to build sources (including generating fancy code and doing pesky pre-computations) which will be then run on a less powerful perl (supported in embedded devices).

  • I find it an amusing double standard that GTK packing boxes are “good” but what amounts to HTML packing boxes (albeit also ones that can be used to display tabular data) are “bad”.

    What’s bad about tables is that they mix presentation with content. Tables in content should be used for tabular data.

    The fact that CSS only has a print-world-originated float layout model but no screen-UI-originated hbox/vbox packing layout model is a serious shortcoming, not good. I don’

  • Is that he actually did enough years ago to earn some serious respect. You probably aren't aware of it because you're not in the Lisp community. Therefore you haven't seen what he did there, or read the resulting classics like On Lisp.

    Back in the mid-90s he decided to show that his knowledge of Lisp was not just theoretical. With a group of fellow elite Lisp programmers (his co-founder was Robert Morris - you know, the guy who took down the entire internet back in the 80s) they founded a company that suc