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NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • Emphasize your ability to learn things. We've all watched you here and know that's one of your strong points. No job requires the exact skillset any new hire has. Let them know that you will be up and running rapidly with whatever they need you to know, and that you'll do a better job picking it up than anyone else.

    For a more long-term job, emphasize the fact that you are always learning new things and improving yourself.

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    J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
    • I never know how to respond to a compliment, so I'll just say, 'Thank You'.

      I do want to ask: Do you mean emphasize it during the interview, on the resume, or both? On the resume, would this be listing self-taught languages/protocols/libraries?

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      You are what you think.
      • Emphasize it on both, but particularly during the interview. Mentioning things you've self-taught yourself on the resume sounds like a good idea. Remember, though, that the resume should be concise. Conventional wisdom says never go over one page.

        --
        J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers