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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • Some birds have four pigments, and see more colors than we trichromats can. (The extra pigment helps them see colors in the UV edge of the visual spectrum -- useful for identifying flowers.)

    If they designed those test-your-color-vision pictures instead of mere humans, we'd all fail their tetrachromat tests. They'd laugh at us. Little chirpy laughs. Full of pity and condescension at our inability to look at a flower and see the "FREE POLLEN HERE" sign in ultrapurple.

    • I remember having read an article somewhere about tetrachromats detected in the human population. Without linguistic support, they were unable to think about the extra colours they were seeing. As a dichromat, I find the interaction between languages and colour perception fascinating.
      • I remember reading something about that a year or so ago.

        IIRC, tetrachromatism in humans is almost exclusively a female trait, much like all forms of color blindness is almost exclusively a male trait. The difference between avian tetrachromatism and human tetrachromatism is that people with the trait do not have ultraviolet color receptors, but have two sets of green (?) color receptors, so they can more finely distinguish colors in the middle of the human-visible spectrum. (I think one test was to tel