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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • I think that summary of the author's point is this:

    "If white people find this restriction on their vocabulary unreasonable they need only bring forward the day when racism is eradicated - a day all black people look forward to - after which they can say what they like."

    I think for white people to not respect the fact that black people don't like to hear white people say it is just fucked up. Just because a black person says something or acts in a certain way does _not_ mean that it's okay for a white p
    • I understood his argument, but I found it fundamentally irrational, or at least irrationally expressed. It was not "the word is bad because..." but instead "this upsets us (or really, some of us), although you wouldn't really understand it".

      Moreover, it's founded on a basically flawed theory of meaning -- the idea that you get to judge words based not on their intended meaning (because that would really be "context"), but on however listeners or passersby want to willfully misconstrue [uiowa.edu] them.

      I run into a s

      • That's all very nice but...

        As a white person its not really your position to be telling black people what they can or cannot be upset over.

        Honestly, it sounds irrational to me too, but I suspect that this comes from the racism of being white. More importantly, I realize that if I made the argument you're making, black people would interpret it as racism. At which point you'd say something about how irrational that is. Except the fact is, that given the average black person's experience, assuming raci
        • As a white person its not really your position to be telling black people what they can or cannot be upset over.

          Then I say the converse is necessarily true: it is not a black person's position, as a black person, to be telling white people what words they can or cannot use.

          I personally don't think anyone has any business telling people what words they can or cannot use, or what they should or should not be upset about, and further that this never has one damned thing to do with color.

          Honestly, it sou

          • Speak for yourself. I am not racist in the slightest.

            It is simply not possible to be white and not be racist. You have enjoyed white privilege your entire life, at the expense of people of color. That is racist.

            Now as to how I'd define white privilige [whiteprivilege.com], just follow [utexas.edu] the [dickshovel.com] links [disciples.org].

            I doubt you could honestly tell me that you haven't experienced those privileges. If you have. but maybe you've never noticed them, that's a privilege too.

            That is the heart of racism. Its not about whether you think black peo
            • by pudge (1) on 2002.01.09 14:21 (#2938) Homepage Journal
              It is simply not possible to be white and not be racist.

              Only insofar as it is not possible to be human and not be racist.

              You have enjoyed white privilege your entire life, at the expense of people of color.

              No, I have not.

              I doubt you could honestly tell me that you haven't experienced those privileges. If you have. but maybe you've never noticed them, that's a privilege too.

              I refuse to bow to your desire to use the word "privilege" to mean "normalcy." Please use words properly. Yes, I know that words mean what people use them to mean, but my hope is that we can stop this linguistic abomination before it spreads much further.

              But no, I have not experienced these things.

              Its about how your life is measurably made easier by your race, while conversely a person of color's life is made more difficult.

              My life is not made easier by my race. It is true that, usually, my life is not made harder by my race. But those two things are not the same. I do not view life as a contest, whereby others being subjugated makes my life that much better or easier. I do not compete with anyone else for what I have. If I could not get what I have because someone else had it, I would get something else. My life is my own. Are the lives of "white people in America" better because of the subjugation of blacks? Perhaps. But what's that got to do with me? I am not a group.

              As to what black people have in common, well, they have in the common the experience of experiencing racism.

              Nonsense. What black people have in common is the same thing we all have in common: being treated poorly for dumb reasons. I have been a victim of such treatment moreso than many black people I know. Growing up in Eastern Massachusetts as a non-Irish non-Italian right-wing conservative Republican born-again Protestant who was smart and awkward and tall and overweight ... I was more of an outcast than any kid of color in the town.

              I am not trying to say that racism isn't bad or serious. But I have had it worse than many black people. I have had it far worse than Tiger Woods, for example. I have been the object of more derision and subjugation than him. It's nonsense to put "blacks" in a special victims group.

              As to my use of the word privilege implying that people don't all deserve to be treated well, I don't think you actually believe I think that.

              Well, then don't keep using that word [imdb.com], then.

              • >> You have enjoyed white privilege your entire life, at the expense of people of color.

                > No, I have not.

                Yes, you have.

                People of color are less able to compete with white people for things like quality education (starting with elementary), college admissions, jobs, housing, loans, etc.

                That's not to mention the fact that if you get arrested you're more likely to get a light sentence (no jail), you're less likely to get arrested in the first place, you're less likely to be beaten by a police
                • People of color are less able to compete with white people for things like quality education (starting with elementary), college admissions, jobs, housing, loans, etc.

                  I do not compete with anyone for any of these things. Education? It was public, open to everyone who lived there. College? Nearly everyone got in to my college, and I would have had a better chance if I were not white. Job? Probably no difference, but if there were, it would be easier if I weren't white. Housing? I was the only one