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NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • So, I guess you think it's wacky for me to be against a publisher who post-copyrights technical books, which people tend to want to be up-to-date, and a publisher of a book that "Rather than simply describing the vulnerabilities and their exploits theoretically or showing you how to use pre-existing tools to exploit the vulnerabilities...provides the nuts & bolts you need to learn how to program your own exploit code." At least you linked to my post, but I'm wondering exactly what you disagree with abou

    • I guess you think it's wacky for me to be against a publisher who post-copyrights technical books...

      As explained before, this is what book publishers do with the permission of the Library of Congress so as to receive copyright the entire length of the copyright period, and not just part of the last year.

      (Of course, O'Reilly books enter the public domain long before the copyright period expires.)

      If the copyright year of 2006 for a book that goes to the printer in December 2005 really causes you that

      • There was a greater difference between the date I bought the book and the printed copyright date than that. Lets try to not be misleading with our examples. I don't know when the book first went on sale, but I bought the book in November and the copyright was listed as the next year. See my original post about it here [perlmonks.org], where I also quote copyright law. If there's some aspect of the law that makes printing a later copyright legal, and if it's done on all major books when applicable, then I'd withdraw my com
        • It is common practice for publishers of technical books to postdate the copyright date. For example, the Hibernate Quickly [amazon.com] sitting on my desk, has a copyright of 2006, but was released August 2005. The date is simply the date the copyright is registered, which you are not required to do. Copyright protection actually begins when you start writing your book, article, program, etc.
          • It's not just technical books.

            But August seems a bit early by the standards I got used to when I was in the used book trade part time.

            Rule of thumb in publishing used to be a book released in the last 3 months of the year carried next year as copyright date (he says working from fuzzy memory). This is not unlike Detroit model years.

             
            --
            Bill
            # I had a sig when sigs were cool
            use Sig;
        • ... at this point I'm not interested in looking into it more deeply than I have.

          There's a word for people who refuse to change their opinions and continue to complain anyway after being corrected.

    • You shouldn’t have said Benchmark.pm “sux” if it doesn’t,

      Apparently you don’t understand the concept of irony.

    • "It's hard to be sure whether other slides are meant to support the sux statement or define it, so I just quoted the sux statement and some other slide without assuming anything."

      Ha!

    • You shouldn't have said Benchmark.pm "sux" if it doesn't...

      It's obvious (to me, anyway) from the slide that he's implying that saying "Benchmark sux" means that it actually sucks in the same way that saying CPANTS "measures kwalitee" means that it actually measures quality. So just saying that "Benchmark sux" is taking the slide out of context.

      • I saw that kwalitee analogy in the slide, but...well, if I could find a link to get to the top post I would look at the slide again, but this forum software sucks. I though the kwalitee thing was just explaining that quality is to kwalitee as sucks is to sux.
    • Mmmm, I missed that:

      “Rather than simply describing the vulnerabilities and their exploits theoretically or showing you how to use pre-existing tools to exploit the vulnerabilities…provides the nuts & bolts you need to learn how to program your own exploit code.”

      I have explained to a number of people how to conduct SQL injection attacks. Will you boycott me now?

      • It's not as bad if you're selective about who your teaching, and it depends on why you're teaching them, but yes, I'll boycott you too. Not sure what you sell though.
        • I would also like to be boycotted. I have written an article, in The Perl Journal or maybe The Perl Review, one of the two, about how to do SQL injection attacks AND hack poorly written CGI scripts, on the way to explaining why taint checking is a good thing. What do I need to do to be boycotted? Is my bringing it to your attention here sufficient? Is there some form I need to fill out? Please reply at your earliest convenience.
          --

          --
          xoa

    • It's hard to be sure whether other slides are meant to support the sux statement or define it, so I just quoted the sux statement and some other slide without assuming anything.

      Why in the world would you quote something you clearly don't understand?

      "I saw it on the internet so it must be true!!"

        - ask
      --

      -- ask bjoern hansen [askbjoernhansen.com], !try; do();

      • Because it was written by a notable author and I was quoting it, not interpreting it in a way I was unsure of. It was written as though "sux" was the bottom line, and it would have been ok to quote it even if I quoted nothing else. I provided a link to the source. Other Wikipedians could have given the module the benefit of the doubt and added more details if they thought it would clarify things. Quoting "sux" was appropriate whether there's total suckiness or not, if that's what a notable author and edito

        • Speaking of suckiness, there's ... you.

          Your opinion is ignored, since I'm the one writing the code, and I hate you.