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NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • I'm glad you participate in these discussions on Slashdot, c.

    Generally your points don't seem to make much headway among those who have some visceral need to mock Perl -- probably no hope there -- but I expect there are many hackers like me who read your comments and gain more understanding about Perl's usefulness to a professional programmer and why it can make programming fun. I also notice that very few people argue with the points you make :)

    • Thanks, Dave. It feels awfully frustrating from the responses, but I'm glad to hear that some of the silent majority of non-commenters finds some benefit.

  • Sure Perl has stuff that's wrong with it and that might make it a bad language, but the stuff in that article is just weak. "Waaaah! I don't like interpolating variables! Don't make me use double quotes! Waaaah!" or "I used Perl for four years and still don't understand scalars! Math is hard! Waaaah!"

  • I particularly liked his argument about elsif. I'll admit that I've always had a hard time typing elsif correctly the first time (without the extra 'e') but how is 'elif' any better. I suppose it is shorter, if less readable, but isn't that supposed to be a bad thing?

    I was also curious about his statement that "most other weakly typed languages get by just fine with using ==". I decided to look up PHP as an example. It seems that PHP does use == for all types but they had to add === to distinguish "equa
    • Much of this guy's argument seems to be that Perl is bad because it is different than some other languages he has used.

      At least he didn't use the word "intuitive", which as far as I can tell means only slightly more than "strong typing" or "weak typing".