Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments
NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
 Full
 Abbreviated
 Hidden
More | Login | Reply
Loading... please wait.
  • This is very sad news, Sky. Maybe the problem is just that it's still not in a final release form. Let us hope so.

    In the meantime, I got an email this week from somone at Perforce saying that they give out free licenses for open-source projects. I'll forward the mail to you.

    --David

    • Re:P4 (Score:3, Informative)

      [Perforce] give out free licenses for open-source projects

      perl5 already uses Perforce as its version control repository. Ignoring the issues about open/closed source software, I seem to remember at least 3 practical problems with it:

      • It does checkouts over ssh, which means that the user has to maintain a ssh tunnel to the repository machine, and the repository machine owner has to maintain the ssh authorized keys file
      • It can't do anonymous read only access
      • Every year the licence key has to be renewed. Thi
      • by tagg (277) on 2003.08.12 9:47 (#23018) Journal
        Each ssh tunnel counts as a user, so I can't have 3 different machines tunneling into the repository simulatenously on 1 licence - I have to drop the connection before starting up the new one.

        Strange. Perforce licenses are normally counted per named user. A named user can have an unlimited number of simultaneous connections (read: client workspaces) to the repository. Of course, the free licenses for open-source projects might differ in this respect from the normal payed-for licenses, which are the ones that I'm familiar with, so YMMV.