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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • As I understand it, the funny character demarks the context of the variable. I haven't played around with this (yet), but what if the array was a list of refs to other arrays? Would that be @array[0] or @$array[0]? If the former, then all the more reason the funny character helps, as it denotes the context.

    Jason

    • Unfortunately it's worse than you think.

      @$array[0] binds the @ more tightly than the [0], so it expects $array to be an array ref, which you're de-referencing, rather than $array[0] being the array ref. Except it doesn't work, because as you know, you don't say @x[0], you say $x[0], so when you say @$array[0], it thinks you're dereferencing $array, not @array, and $array doesn't exist (well it might, but it's not what you meant).

      Now @{$x[0]} will give you the de-referenced array in the first entry in th