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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • Boston.

    As to why you remember them I have no idea. A friend of mine was an au-pair there years ago, and she found it amusing that a many of the streets were named after British towns and cities :)

    • by jdporter (36) on 2004.01.17 23:28 (#27495) Homepage Journal
      Well, that's an au pair for ya. Anybody with half a brain wouldn't find it amusing. Hell, Boston itself was named after a British town. It is "New England", after all. Every geographic feature there is named after a place in England, or else it has an Indian name. (To overgeneralize a little...)

      O.k., just for fun, here are the names of the 50 states, categorized by the origin of the name.

      Indian names (mostly names of tribes in the area):
      Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Connecticut, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi,
      Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Wisconsin, Wyoming

      Named after English persons:
      Delaware, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia

      Named for places in England:
      New Hampshire
      New Jersey
      New York

      Neo-classical:
      California
      Indiana

      Spanish:
      Arizona
      Colorado
      Florida
      Montana
      Nevada

      French:
      Maine
      Vermont

      Seems like the Spanish and French preferred to assign names which were descriptive of the terrain/climate. In this regard, California ought to be lumped in with the Spanish names. (and maybe Indiana could be lumped with the Indian names, even though it isn't one...)