Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments
NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
 Full
 Abbreviated
 Hidden
More | Login | Reply
Loading... please wait.
  • "A laptop that dies (the horrible, unrecoverable hard drive grind of death) less than a week after you switch your life over to it is not cool."

    A Mac? Just curious.

    • Fool, the first rule about Mac problems is "You don't talk about Mac problems".

      Last OSCON I saw macs fail 3-4 times in a week, with a wwhole variety of problems.

      And the common thread seemed to be people telling me "Please don't tell anyone that my Mac broke".
      • Funny you should say that. I noticed a few years ago that there seemed to be a sharp increase in the "my mac broke" blog entries. I even mentioned this fact at some point here, though I can't find it now.

        I've never really believed the whole "mac hardware is better" meme. Not only that, I've pretty much reached the "mac hardware is unreliable" stage and it's one of the reasons I've avoided buying one.

        • I used to think that too. But then I got a Powerbook, and the only problem I've had in the last 2.5 years is when I've put third-party memory in, which is a known questionable practice with macs. My impression is that macs (at least Powerbooks) probably break down as often as other high-end laptops do. Sure, there are certain models of macs that have more failures, but there are certain models of all machines that have more failures.
        • With the exception of OS versions 8 and 9, I've been dealing with Macintoshes since 1985. I've also been dealing with PCs since the days when the phrase "PC clone" meant something. My exposure to both of these platforms has been both from an end user perspective as well as the screwdriver-turning service and support person.

          In my experience, Macs are generally less prone to hardware failure than PC clones. I do realize that there seems to be a disproportionately high number of Mac hardware problems amon

        • I've never really believed the whole "mac hardware is better" meme.

          I've been using Macs for 22 years, and the only problems I've ever had are component failure (which happens on any computer), and HFS (regular, Extended, Journaling, whatever) corruption problems. I've repaired lots and lots of corrupted HFS volumes over the years.

          The annoying thing is, when you're debugging a crash combined with HFS corruption, you really can't tell if the corruption caused the crash or the crash caused the corrupti

          • "I've been using Macs for 22 years, and the only problems I've ever had are component failure (which happens on any computer), and HFS (regular, Extended, Journaling, whatever) corruption problems."

            So, we're pretty much talking about motherboards, cpu's and hard drives.

            Motherboards

            I've never had a motherboard fail, nor known anyone who had. The only motherboard failures I've even heard about were caused by lightning strikes or maybe a shoddy piece of hardware bought from an expo, but even that's rare

            • "Hard Drives

              This is the only component that you typically hear about PC users having problems with, though I never have personally [...]"

              Clearly you don't have enough storage then! :-)

              If you have ~20 drives you are more likely to have a failure every other year than if you have 3.

              Of course who'd be silly enough to have 20+ disks (not counting servers in the datacenter). uuh, nevermind.

                - ask
              --

              -- ask bjoern hansen [askbjoernhansen.com], !try; do();