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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • Yeah, homeschooling is one of those odd things where both the extreme left and extreme right have a tendency to have common resources and goals. One of my left-ish friends homeschooled his kids, and had lots of conversations with right-ish homeschoolers as well. Interesting.
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    • Randal L. Schwartz
    • Stonehenge
    • This is one of the things I really like about homeschooling. There are so many different points of view. As long as all subscribe to the fundamental mantra of homeschooling, in my mind, "Parents are the best judge of how to raise and educate their own children," I appreciate what they are doing and love looking at the diversity for cross-pollination of ideas.

      Somewhere I read somebody saying the tree-huggers (or some similar offensive term for leftist environmentalists) paved the way, the religious funda

      --
      J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
      • Parents are the best judge of how to raise and educate their own children

        And... everyone is above average [freep.com] too.

        On a more serious note, being the best judge of how to do it (which I don't agree with... but let's just pretend for a moment) still doesn't make you the most capable person of doing it.

        I personally will be home schooling my kids... every day after they get home from school. I will add to their learning experience.

        Not shield them from it.

        It seems to me that this is the real purpose for many po
        • I personally will be home schooling my kids... every day after they get home from school. I will add to their learning experience. Not shield them from it.

          How is teaching kids shielding them learning? I could just as easily say, by sending your kids off to school during the day, you are shielding them from opportunties they could otherwise have.

          What your statement assumes is that sending a kid to a school is the best or default way for them to learn these things, or that it is somehow something people
          • How is teaching kids shielding them learning?

            Taking them out of formal school so that they won't experience something (political, religious, social) is the shielding I was referring to.

            The only case I've personally experienced was where someone started home schooling because they didn't want their kid taught evolution.

            If you can't deal with exposing your kid to a theory, you have a serious problem, IMHO. At the very least, teach them to refute the damn thing. But, to completely limit exposure?

            What your statement assumes is that sending a kid to a school is the best or default way for them to learn these things, or that it is somehow something people "should" do. Says who? Where is this written or demonstrated? What's so sacred about schools?

            Well, if that is what you read... then I offer myself as a perfect example of someone that shouldn't teach his kids language skills. (Something I'll agree to any way.)

            Let's try it this way:

            Let A represent the knowledge that can be gained thru formal schooling.

            Let B represent the knowledge that can be gained thru home schooling.

            Note that A and B can be equal. A can be greater than B. B can be greater than A.

            My proposition is that A + B > B for all cases. (Likewise, A + B > A for all cases.)

            That is it. That is my message.

            (I've expressed it as a mathematical equation to get the idea across. It isn't that simple... and the equation isn't even valid due to areas of overlap between A and B. Again, I only did it to make up for the lack of english skills.)

            ---

            Now, for the most part I have been generalizing.

            Some places will have excellent schools. Some kids will have excellent parents. Some will have both. Some will have neither.

            But, in every case, A + B provide maximum results. (Simply because neither can be negative.)

            So, I believe that the best strategy... in all cases... is formal schooling combined with home schooling.

            ---

            One other note: I'm really only addressing education/learning.

            There really are viable reasons for pulling a kid out of a school. But, I maintain that the kid should be put in another school for maximum benefit. Obviously, if another school is not available (location, cost) then home schooling alone would be better than nothing.
            • The only case I've personally experienced was where someone started home schooling because they didn't want their kid taught evolution.

              OK. But that is the very small minority in my experience.

              Although, I would note that public schools are not allowed to teach religion in this way ... :-)

              My proposition is that A + B > B for all cases. (Likewise, A + B > A for all cases.)

              Where A and B represent useful knowledge, I cannot agree. Sure, my kids can learn some things in school they won't learn at h
            • The only case I've personally experienced was where someone started home schooling because they didn't want their kid taught evolution.

              Well, conveniently, now that you have read my journal, only 20% of the cases you have heard about are for that reason. The four families I mentioned are homeschooling for other reasons.

              If you can't deal with exposing your kid to a theory, you have a serious problem, IMHO. At the very least, teach them to refute the damn thing. But, to completely limit exposure?

              Who

              --
              J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
            • I've really got to agree with pudge's case that a lot of school is a waste of time. (He seems to perhaps be saying 100% of school ... I'd have to make the percentage somewhat lower.)

              I have an informal list of "reasons that made it easier for me to choose homeschooling." This list isn't written, yet; it consists of things that I just did not like or do not like about the system of schooling; these are not items that constitute reasons why I am going to homeschool, but things that made it easier for me to

              --
              J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
              • I've really got to agree with pudge's case that a lot of school is a waste of time.

                I would agree. I was bored out of my gourd in high school.

                I rarely did homework... had 18 zeros one quarter in my English Comp. class.

                Still graduated 26th (of ~450) in my class.

                It was a totally horrendous waste of time, in my view, at the time.

                And, I would totally agree that it needs to be imporved.

                BTW, what in this post says anything about shielding kids from evolution?

                Nothing in your post. I brought that up from m