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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • I don't actually write the Changes file directly from git, but I find this command rather helpful when preparing a new release:

    git --no-pager log --no-merges --pretty=format:' %x20%x20 - %s (%an)' `git tag | tail -n 1`..

    Which prints the summary of all changes since the last release (= last git tag). In fact I added this (and a few variations) to my .gitconfig, like this:

    [alias]
            lastchanges =!git --no-pager log --no-merges --pretty=format:' %x20%x20 - %s (%an)' `git tag | tail

    • neat tip, thanks domm!

    • Nifty stuff, thanks!

      After reading your comment, I wrote a simple script to convert the `git --no-pager log --no-merges` to a well structured Changes file. The only problem was that you can't figure the version of the file each time. However, if one will add a check in the script to see when a certain file's $VERSION had changed, one would be able to output a well structured Changes file from git history. Sounds like an idea for a module, really. Maybe I'll sit and write it some day.

      For some reason the forma