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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • POD always (still) sticks in the craw.

    I understand I have to learn a programming language to speak to a computer, but not that I need to learn a mark up language to speak to a human.

    I have a POD-learning block. I always cut and paste, or I have to go round finding out how to do it.

    How are the POD dialects going to work?
    • I understand I have to learn a programming language to speak to a computer, but not that I need to learn a mark up language to speak to a human.

      Well, it's not exactly to speak but to write, which is a related but different thing. And writing itself can have many different "incarnations" depending on one's actual aim. In this case, for example it's to document (Perl code) which is a slightly specialized form of writing as opposed to generic one.

      I have a POD-learning block. I always cut and paste, or I have to go round finding out how to do it.

      I suppose it all boils down to how often you happen to use it, like with most other things.

      How are the POD dialects going to work?

      I don't have the slightest idea. AFAICT S26 only says:

      Perldoc allows for multiple syntactic I<dialects>, all of which map onto the same set of standard document objects. The standard dialect is named "Pod".

      But seriously, from what I've read they're trying to make POD as lightweight and TMTOWTDIsh as possible.

      --
      -- # This prints: Just another Perl hacker, seek DATA,15,0 and print q... ; __END__