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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • I'll notice those more often now...

    The first of the big two that really grate on me is 'choices''. No, not choices that isn't a word, the word you are looking for is options.

    The other is the completely incorrect use of the word either. It means one or the other. It does not mean both. Of course this does provide genuine humour when reading engineering documents, for example: put the wings on either side of the plane. Which side? Left, or right? Please, do tell....

    :-)
    • by pudge (1) on 2002.03.23 19:31 (#6267) Homepage Journal
      Hm. First, Webster's notes that either may be more than just two options:
      Scarce a palm of ground could be gotten by either of the three. --Bacon.
      Additionally, that it might mean all options:
      His flowing hair In curls on either cheek played. --Milton.
      On either side ... was there the tree of life. --Rev. xxii. 2.
      But, if you'd like to argue with Webster, Bacon, Milton, and GOD, be my guest. :-)
      • Its not really that I'd care to argue, just that it leads to complete ambiguity.

        Either meaning one or the other vs. either meaning both, and no real way to tell the difference. One definition contradicts the other.

        Maybe I'm wrong in saying that its incorrect English, but it certainly isn't clear english :-)