Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments
NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
 Full
 Abbreviated
 Hidden
More | Login | Reply
Loading... please wait.
  • Don't ignore that Paul Graham doesn't want everyone to use his language (see "Beating the averages" [paulgraham.com]. He doesn't care about everyone, and he's making this for a handful of people who know the secret handshake. It's not supposed to be easy to understand because that doesn't filter out the people he thinks shouldn't be programmers.

    • Good point. I disagree with him on that, but that's possibly due to my naive fantasy of wanting to help average developers become good developers. This might not be possible for many (most?) of them. I really don't know.

      • Superstar programmers are born, not made. I don’t think there’s any way to change that. It takes a certain mental predisposition that does not appear to be teachable; either your mind works that way or it does not.

        Nevertheless, if you look at spreadsheets, you’ll see that by reducing the minimum required ability for abstraction and increasing the amount of computation state that's tangibly visible, people with little programming skill can be empowered to harness computing machines for th

        • Superstar programmers are born, not made. I don’t think there’s any way to change that.

          As someone who didn't do programming until their 20s, I must call bullshit. It's sort of like the people who think that if you haven't written your first masterpiece at age 9 you can never learn to play the piano.

          It takes a certain mental predisposition that does not appear to be teachable; either your mind works that way or it does not.
          I think you have reversed the cause and effect. We teach algorithms and data structures, but we don't teach how to think like a programmer. We barely examine it, partially because we're bad at people. Partially because we have the idea that it can't be taught, so why bother trying?

          This is why (currently) the best programmers are self-taught, they're self-selected for motivation and successfully having learned how to think like a programmer. If they didn't successfully learn, lacking a CS degree to fool people into thinking otherwise, they wouldn't be programmers.

          Some evidence for this can be seen in just how much retraining one has to do of a fresh CS graduate when they get their first job. They have not been taught how machines work, but not how to think like a programmer.

          Programming has also traditionally been very close to the metal calling for a very specialized set of skills and knowledge and a strong math background. As we slowly pull up and away from that and programming becomes less about how the machine works and more about conceptual translation. It's about generalizing and encoding real-world procedures down to a fixed set of steps with all the necessary extra work for when things go wrong. Those are two things which can and are taught, just not traditionally to programmers. :)