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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • My first reaction on hearing Chip's story was "Thank goodness I don't live and work in America". In fact, it seems to be a blatant violation of the fourth amendment [everything2.com], but IANAL and IANAA.

    I would be interested in what rights and protection a whistle blower can claim under laws in different countries, when their employer is behaving unlawfully. The Sarbanes-Oxley act of 2002 was introduced in the US, in the wake of Enron, and seems to give some protection to a whistle blower. But it seems that this might be restricted to financial issues - misrepresentation of a company's accounts, concealing/destroying data, etc. Also, its debatable whether this is true 'protection'.

    In many ways, S-Ox has put many third parties, accountants and auditors especially, in an awkward position. They are now comitting a felony if they continue to cover up their client's misdemeanours, but they stand to lose the account if they speak the truth.