Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments
NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
 Full
 Abbreviated
 Hidden
More | Login | Reply
Loading... please wait.
  • Why can't hollywood, the courts, and our government figure that out?

    Because they are part of a big money making scheme that has gone a bit scue-whiff with all the bungled management decisions they have made in the last 10-20 years.

    Unfortunately DeCSS *has* been used for illegal purposes, and the limited guidance that these people and their lawyers appear to have had, all points to anyone using this technology to be using illegal software.

    Once upon a time, the movie industry was a successful enterprise. Millions upon millions of people would take a trip to the cinema on a Saturday night and there were some great movies to see, including the countless B Movies. Then television happened. Since that time, attendances have dropped and the movie industry has had to seek other resources to fund their projects.

    Originally, even up to the early eighties, movie giants had said their films would not be made for retail only rental outlets, for the simple reason it cost a lot to produce a video cassette and they couldn't see the was any mass market. However the music video suddenly took off and movie giants at last saw the potential.

    In the last 20 years movie companies, in particular Hollywood movie companies, have made a sizeable proportion of their revenue from merchandise, which now includes Video and DVD sales. They make less films than they did 50+ years ago, and films cost much more (even accounting for inflation) to make. As a consequence *anything* that *might* affect their current revenue is seen as a threat.

    Misunderstanding the Internet's potential has meant that rather than be proactive to do something about DeCSS so that people like yourself are not affected, they are being, as per usual for big business, very reactive in trying to close the door. In the short term it might save them millions according to their figures, but if it means the likes of people, such as yourself, buy less DVDs because you can't play them as much, its only going to see a long term down turn in sales. For which they'll blame the Internet.

    Its interesting to note that the music industry is blaming the Internet for lack of sales, dispite the lack of investment the industry puts back into nuturing the long term careers of artists, or the large amount of dross that they shell out to the kids. In the UK since the 'House' phenonemon of the mid to late 80s and the rise in the rave culture along with the boy/girl band flavour of the months, the amount of venues up and down the country that have been forced to close has been heartbreaking. Touring bands now have a very limited number of venues they can play, and very often have to resort to playing a half filled NEC Arena. New bands now quite often have make their own way and don't get picked up until they've recorded at least one album or have a fan base that is difficult to ignore. But I digress.

    Personally I think that merchandise sales and box office figures are not at as good as they could be, due to the amount of dross we are fed these days. I know there were some really bad movies in the 50s and 60s, but they were funny and have since become cult classics. Todays throwaways are unlikely to be as well remembered in years to come, and only then when you happen to be looking stuff on IMDB.

    At the end of the day, companies should learn to adapt to the new technology without sacrificing the quality they produce. The turn out to recent outings for Star Wars, Lord Of The Rings, etc shows that good quality movies do pay. Keep 'em coming and you'll soon have people queuing like theres no tomorrow again. If sales weren't being affected DeCSS would be seen as a minor inconvience.

    Okay, okay ... I'll go quietly now ;)