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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • The one thing that can cause wrist problems when playing squash is having too much experience playing badminton. The weight of a badminton racquet is about a quarter that of a squash racquet; and the badminton bird weighs a miniscule fraction of a squash ball. So, you can use your wrists to do a lot of the delicate control action when swinging a badminton racquet, and even provide all of the motive force for many shots; in squash, you have to use your arm rather than the wrist to provide most of the motive power and if you are flexing your wrist at the moment of impact you get a lot more of the force pushing back on your wrist because of the leverage and weight of the squash apparatus. (The weight of the racquet actually helps balance the leverage of the ball, as long as you have the racquet moving fast enough before the impact its momentum will be great enough that it reduces the transfer of force from the ball to your wrist. It's just when you are trying to accelerate them both at once that you get problems.) Tennis, of course, is at the other extreme of the weight-leverage continuum from badminton, and for tennis you use your arm for essentially all of the motion - so if your previous experience is mostly tennis, then you'll have to learn to use your wrist more to play squash well, to get the last moment changes in speed and direction that can teach your opponent not to react to your shot before you make it.