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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • I hope I'm not starting a licensing flamewar here, but your licence section reads:

    This module is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as Perl itself. See L.

    Now, the same terms as Perl (?) itself, if we assume that Perl == perl 5, would mean a dual-GPLv2-and-above and Artistic 1.0 *only*. Now, the Artistic 1.0 licence is very vague and is considered neither GPL-compatible nor free by the Free Software Foundation [fsf.org]. And the GPL is well, the GPL [gnu.org] and has its own res

    • Do you realize this is the standard way of licensing Perl modules? What in the world made you single out this one module and this one author for this subject?

      --
      J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
      • Do you realize this is the standard way of licensing Perl modules? What in the world made you single out this one module and this one author for this subject?

        I didn't single out Aristotle or his module in particular, nor accused him of doing anything wrong in particular. I just noted that in his general request-for-comments for the module because I noticed it there. (Better late than never, I guess).

        I just wanted to note that from now on, it would be a better idea from the legal standpoint to use a different wording of the licensing terms as I explained above to avoid the licensing problems that the "same as perl5" face.

        But thanks for noting that - I'll convert and extend my comments into a blog post on my use.perl.org journal for future consideration. Expect a flamewar about it on an RSS aggregator near you. ;-)

        That put aside, an alternative to this, which I'm using, is to use licences that permit relicensing of derived works, to other free (or non-free) licences. The MIT X11 licence explicitly allows "sub-licensing" and is my preferred licence for Perl and non-Perl open-source work. Some of the modules I maintain on CPAN still carry different licensing terms (usually "same as perl") because I inherited them from different authors. In that case, I normally disclaim all rights to the module, so all the remaining copyright holders of the code can make re-licensing decisions without me.

        Thanks again.