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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • I am not looking for a discussion or argument ... I've just been reading lately a lot of people talking about the "Anglosphere," remarking about how it was the English-speaking nations -- Australia, UK, U.S., and even the English-speaking Canadians -- who were largely behind the war in Iraq, and how there is may be some benefit in a treaty between English-speaking nations.

    I'd never really thought of the world as easily separable by language like that, across great distances, but it actually seems to make s
    • by da (1525) on 2005.11.15 11:31 (#44551) Homepage Journal
      ...just happened across this entry. I realize you weren't looking for discussion or arguement, and I hope to not provide the latter, but I think two things are worth pointing out.

      With an obvious exception (the US), the associations are there in the Commonwealth of Nations [wikipedia.org], which has existed since the 1920s and currently has its most effect through cultural links instead of explicit treaties (though there are a number of policies that are harmonized between Commonwealth countries).

      What that means for international identities today, I'm not sure.

      Secondly, as an American living in Canada, who moved here just before September 2001, I can say pretty clearly that english-speaking Canada was not solidly behind the war in Iraq; an ipsos-reid poll I just dug up says two weeks after the war started, 54% of English Canada supported the war (48% including Francophones). http://www.ipsos-na.com/news/pressrelease.cfm?id=1784 [ipsos-na.com] In mid-2002, approximately 65% of Canadians were opposed to Canadian involvement in the war without UN sanctions, or approved of US involvement, according to Environics polls (http://erg.environics.net/news/default.asp?aID=516 [environics.net]). Though Environics' numbers suggested 70% of Canadians were opposed to the war after the first six months, so higher than ipsos-reids' poll results.

      Anyway, just wanted to fill that bit in.

      --

      -DA [coder.com]

      • Secondly, as an American living in Canada, who moved here just before September 2001, I can say pretty clearly that english-speaking Canada was not solidly behind the war in Iraq; an ipsos-reid poll I just dug up says two weeks after the war started, 54% of English Canada supported the war

        What I meant was that it was a solid majority (which I think this poll shows, pretty clearly). I didn't mean to imply the support was overwhelming.