Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments
NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
 Full
 Abbreviated
 Hidden
More | Login | Reply
Loading... please wait.
  • I can define multiple target audiences and potentially different needs they have:

    Installers like CPANPLUS
    Should ignore POD failures.
    Smoke Testers
    Should potentially alert authors to POD failures, but not fail the module because of this.
    Developers (module authors)
    All tests must pass.
    Power Users
    Test timings, code coverage over time, tagged tests, aggregating multiple TAP streams from multiple projects, critical failure response and so on.

    All of the above issues have cropped up mult

    • My point was that you said "casual users" shouldn't see a difference. None of the examples you gave are casual users.

      I think worrying about two different companies with internal "Customer" modules is over-engineering a solution that can be solved with culture instead of code. All you need to do is document that using a generic module name increases the odds of a namespace conflict. Companies that care can name their internal test modules Yoyodyne::Internal::Customer or whatever suits their fancy.

      I think
      • Casual users: How would you define 'casual user' then? Someone who never runs tests? Then that's someone who will never see an impact anyway. I thought that the installers should be the 'casual users' because most of use use CPAN or CPANPLUS or make to install a new module. Those are the ones who shouldn't see a difference and those are the ones I view as casual users.

        Namespaces: I'm rather unhappy with the 'lower-case reserved' suggestion as I think the embedded dot is a reasonable compromise, but Schwern's already made up his mind, so we're going to have to live with it. Don't get me wrong, I would love a perfect design, but I also realize we can't get one and being willing to adopt a dot delimited namespace is a compromise which at least avoids the Unicode issues and makes it trivial and unambiguous for parsers to know what a user-defined key is and what isn't.