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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • The public domain is mainly a feature of US legislation. Similar costructs exist in other jurisdictions, but not everywhere. F.ex., in Germany, you can say you’re putting your work in the public domain all you want but it won’t be legally binding in court.

    Germany, f.ex., has “author’s right,” not “copyright,” and an author can’t renounce their authorship of their work. The only way for their rights to expire is when they die. However, you can grant usage rig

    • I am not a lawyer or a legal expert, but I too heard that the Public Domain is a problematic concept, especially when it comes to software. There's some widely used software out there that's Public Domain [freshmeat.net] and it seems to be doing pretty fine. (Though in one of the latest FLOSS weekly interviews, the SQLite creator and maintainer said he has been providing a for-pay token commercial licence to SQLite to please the lawyers of some companies which have a problem with it.). Nevertheless, you are right that t

      • Yeah, well, individual developers and the small fish companies tend not to care much (as well they don’t tend to care much about licensing in general). For companies large enough to have a legal department, though, it tends to be a worry.

        And yeah, it would be nice if there was a good licence even simpler than the MIT licence. (I’ve expressed this desire before. [perl.org]) My personal preference is LGPL for applications and large libraries and some hypothetical licence even less restrictive than MITL for

        • I never realised the X11L was not free enough. I thought the WTFPL was a nice joke, but I see that it may make some sense. It's too bad the concept of Public Domain is so much legally disputed, especially when it comes to software.

          Well, I'm still going to use the X11L for what I do, as there isn't a better alternative, and people can interpret it to mean that I basically don't care what you do with it. (As long as one doesn't do terminal PD-violating-things like suing me for copyrights violations that

          • : It's too bad the concept of Public Domain is so much legally disputed,

            It is not "disputed". The whole concept Public Domain *does* *not* *exist* outside U.S. legal system. Proposing it or even talking about it is like arguing for, say, U. S. electoral college (if you don't know, you don't want to know) for other countries. Makes no sense whatsoever.

            And in general, I find software people talking about licenses and other legal matters about as funny as lawyers talking about programming.

            • It is not "disputed". The whole concept Public Domain *does* *not* *exist* outside U.S. legal system.

              Are you sure? According to this wikipedia article about the Public Domain [wikipedia.org], it exists in several other countries besides the U.S. (though the article in question may be wrong). I know many countries (including Israel) have a limited term of copyrights, after which something hapens to the work. Normally, I believed it enters the Public Domain (or "Nahh'lath Haklal" in Hebrew), but I could be wrong.

              And in general, I find software people talking about licenses and other legal matters about as funny as lawyers talking about programming.

              I hope you're not proposing that we must not discuss it. Software Licences affect us all, and abusin