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NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • by Zach Lipton (2469) on 2001.11.16 19:44 (#1909)
    I'm a middle school student (8th grade) who happens to be part of the Bugzilla bug tracking system core development team. (Bugzilla is used by mozilla.org, Redhat, Ximian, NASA, and others.) Instead of creating a "dumbed down" version of perl for middle-schoolers to understand, why not introduce the language, but in a context that kids can understand? Introduce a single user adventure-game MUD-like program at the begining of the text to explain subs, vars, if statements, etc... Then go through and explain what each line does and how it works. Building onto that existing program, allowing for the saving of games into files to demonstrate filehandles, etc... would teach about perl while letting kids have fun modifying the text and storyline of the game (and who said programming isn't fun).
    • I think that I have not dumbed it down but done what you suggest in my "Pearls of Perl" document at:

      http://home.mindspring.com/~djrassoc01/PoP/Pop.htm l

      See also the companion computer club newsletters and an earlier text book like attempt at:

      http://home.mindspring.com/~djrassoc01/PoP/index.h tml

      Success depends crucially on how you structure the thing. For example, I have found if you hit them with the "adventure code" first, many will glaze over and you will lose them to other pursuits. The ones wh