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NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • I don't think git is going to magically draw more contributors to a project, but it certainly does make the lives of everyone involved with the project easier.

    Even if you end up with the same number of contributions when compared to svn, I still think git is worth the switch. Being able to add a remote repository and cherry-pick a specific patch, or merge a branch in a matter of minutes is great. I don't maintain any popular projects, but for the few that I do get contributions [github.com], it has made my job much quic

    • I don't think git is going to magically draw more contributors to a project, but it certainly does make the lives of everyone involved with the project easier.

      That's my view so far, qualitative and as best I can quantitative*, based this project that converted to git [perl.org].

      So I think that Adam's hypothesis that a conversion to git doesn't materially change the contributor profile seems to remain unchallenged.

      * I'm not a statistician, and the data that I extract seems to have a lot of variation, so I'm not comfortable that I can reliably draw any conclusions about commit rate and contributor change, apart from "it's noisy". Certainly, there has been no massive increase in either. Despite a lot of noise about "perforce being the barrier that prevents me contributing".

      • To clarify, my main annoyance with git is just general usability stuff on the platform I work on.

        I don't have a hypothesis on contribution rates yet, I'm just looking for data and open to either rates going up or down.

      • Despite a lot of noise about “perforce being the barrier that prevents me contributing”.

        We have learned from the discipline of program optimisation that removing the major bottleneck just reveals the next, and what these people are actually saying is “Perforce was the first thing I ran into that discouraged me beyond my motivation threshold”. Progress exists, though, regardless of whether silver bullets do.