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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • You honestly think that in a mere 10 years, it will be impossible to get a job as a C programmer? We'll have operating systems written in Haskell and word processors written in Erlang?

    C was being used to write operating systems 33 years ago, and it's still going strong. There will always be a call for a language that lets you be somewhat platform-independent while still giving you the ability to get very close to the bare metal.

    There is a place for functional programming--many places, as a matter of fact--but to claim that it's the right tool for every job is just silly.

    • You honestly think that in a mere 10 years, it will be impossible to get a job as a C programmer?

      Um, read the footnote again. That assertion is as valid (and as plausible) as the assertion that today, August 2006, the number of Perl Monger groups is very nearly the same as the number of people on the planet (+/- ~10%), and by this time next year, the number of Perl Monger groups will exceed the human population of the Earth by roughly 10x.

    • It doesn't seem too far off to me. Bare metal gets further and further from the PDP-11 every day.

    • In 10 years time, if you're programming in C, it will be because you're programming a burglar alarm or a fridge. Possibly an operating system, although I suspect l4 style microkernels will have made inroads, and most OS code will be running in "user space" and might be written in Haskell.

      However, a game, a word processor, a network daemon, you'd be writing in Haskell, Perl, or perhaps Java (but by then, Java will probably look very Haskelly, and Perl 6 already does).
      • However, a game, a word processor, a network daemon, you'd be writing in Haskell, Perl, or perhaps Java (but by then, Java will probably look very Haskelly, and Perl 6 already does).

        I'm not so sure.

        First, C will never completely die. Assembly language is still useful, even if it isn't used by 99.44% of programmers. But the idea of assembly language is still very useful, and still deserves to be one of many cornerstones of any good CS degree. And, periodically, the idea of assembly is useful when