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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • All? (Score:3, Interesting)

    This morning the radio woke me up announcing the visit of the Dalai Lama in Paris. Just a thought...
    • Re:All? (Score:2, Insightful)

      The Dalai Lama in Paris? Were there demonstrations, calls for the removal of his travel documents and immediate expulsion?

      I know some people in France consider religion an "Unnecessary Evil".

      ...Or maybe it's just the Christian religion? That must be it. No one would dare apply the term "Evil" to any religion except for Christianity, certainly not Buddhism, certainly not Islam. No, that would be considered insensitive.

      • Firstly, the Dalai Lama is considered here more as a political authority (the lead of the resistance against the Chinese assimilation and colonization of Tibet) than an religious one. In spite of their colorful folklore, there are very few Tibetan Buddhists on the planet currently.

        Secondly, your assertion that atheism or agnosticism may lead to religious intolerance is just pure FUD. If you want to find a country were the Dalai Lama would be unwelcome on the sole basis of his religious opinions, you'd bett

          • Firstly, the Dalai Lama is considered here more as a political authority (the lead of the resistance against the Chinese assimilation and colonization of Tibet) than an religious one...

          Ask the Dalai Lama if he considers himself to be a religious leader or a political leader. I think you'll find that he considers himself to be both [tibet.com].

          • In spite of their colorful folklore, there are very few Tibetan Buddhists on the planet currently.

          I think you'll find the Dalai Lama is one of these Tibetan Buddhists. The

          • The Dalai Lama might consider himself -- and be considered by Tibetans -- as a religious authority, that's usually not revelant when he's received by political authorities in non-Buddhist countries, including India, where he lives. I very much doubt that Bush, receiving him at the White House not so long ago, considered him as a religious authority. Neither does Debré.

            And you're surely joking when you're asserting that Robin's game of words about the well-known idiom "necessary evil" was to be taken

            • by jordan (120) on 2003.10.15 12:24 (#24886) Homepage Journal
              I'm sure you're right about this. Being European and thus far more worldly and informed that a silly American like myself.

              I expect it's just a mistake that the President's press Secretary insisted that he was a spiritual and religious and not a political leader [whitehouse.gov]:

              Q Ari, is the President prepared to press China on Tibetan rights? And why didn't he meet with the Dalai Lama in the Oval Office, why in the Roosevelt?

                        MR. FLEISCHER: The President met with him in the residence in connection with the visit from a spiritual and religious leader. The President thought it was the appropriate place to have the meeting. It's interesting, too, it came up this morning about the previous administration used to have drop-bys, for example, with the Dalai Lama, as opposed to a meeting. Going back to administrations before the Clinton administration, there used to be meetings. So the President is maintaining the longstanding tradition of meeting with the Dalai Lama.

                        I've issued a statement in regard to what the meeting covered. I won't bother to go through the statement again; you have that at your disposal, you can read that. It addresses your question, Campbell.

                        Q Ari, you keep referring to him repeatedly as a spiritual leader. Does that mean you do not believe he has a temporal voice, as many of his people do?

                        MR. FLEISCHER: Well, Tibet is not seeking and is not viewed as an independent nation. Tibet is a part of China.

                        Q He does have strong political views about autonomy, and it's something that he campaigns for.

                        MR. FLEISCHER: And I've addressed in the statement that you have what the President's reaction was to the meeting.

              • And you're surely joking when you're asserting that Robin's game of words about the well-known idiom "necessary evil" was to be taken seriously.

              I recognized it as a play on words and meant to be a flippant comment. I also recognized it as tasteless and frightening that someone would ascribe the term "Evil" and especially "Unnecessary Evil", thus placing it below the category of a "Necessary Evil" to a whole religion, even in jest. I can't imagine anyone making a similar off-hand gibe at Buddhism or Islam without being challenged.
              • I'm pretty sure Robin doesn't place Buddhism above or below Christianism, or than any other religion for that matter. That might not be your case.

              Now, what reason do you have for taking this pot shot? I've given you no reason to believe that I have a prejudice against any religion, have I?

              I guess, since I'm American, you can naturally assume that I hate all those weird or foreign institutions, right?

              It's difficult to get Europeans to admit they might have biases, but for some foolish reason, I try.