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NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • My impression, reading the article, was that the author has a lot of experience with crappily managed Free Software. Which I would suggest is not uncommon in academic settings (at least, it was at the school I attended in the mid-90s). Beyond the lies in the article, I got a mild grin out of:

    Another way to get free software is to have students develop our critical systems. We all know how clever students are and how being born in the computer age they have bypassed a million years of evolution to become cyber sapiens. Software development is instinctive to them. While your aging, over-21 staff demands high salaries and benefits, and fusses with security, documentation, and project planning, cyber sapiens work for a few dollars an hour and can manage several projects in their heads without writing a single thing down. They also write bug-free code, work during exams and vacations, and are not distracted by alcohol, sports, or the acquisition of potential mates.

    So he's a cynic. Which would be fine, if he didn't also lie:

    We may have to give up project planning, quality control, coding standards, accountability, version control, and support, but it’s FREE and we get the ability to modify the source code ourselves, something that is extremely dangerous to do, was discredited decades ago, and few people do anyway.

    I hope they get a huge pile of nastygrams from ex-readers.

    --

    -DA [coder.com]