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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • One thing I still don't understand about Paris is the fact that you're not allowed to walk on the grass in parks. What is the grass for then?

    One thing to know is that there are gardens in which you can walk and lie on the grass. Well, you're breaking the rules but no one will care. Two of them (the only two I go to) are the Parc de Belleville and the Buttes Chaumont. I quite like those parks, if you ever visit them drop me an email and I'll bring the wine.

    I think the main reason why it's forbidden in most places is because the French know nothing about grass. In other words, if it's green and on the ground, that's enough. Walking on the grass would (and in fact does) kill it. Why French gardeners don't go learn about real grass abroad is beyond me, but it's certainly something we could consider requesting from Delanoë ;)

    --

    -- Robin Berjon [berjon.com]

    • I moved from Paris to London when I was 3 years old and apparently I ran around Hyde Park asking my mother if I was really allowed to walk on the grass ;-)
      • Back in the 1950's, the director of the Toronto Parks authority put up signs in all of the public parks saying: "Please walk on the grass". I never knew before who might be needing explicit signs for that.
        • Parks in Helsinki have small signs saying something to the effect "All sorts of enjoying yourself (while not disturbing others) ABSOLUTELY ALLOWED."