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NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • And you tell it like it is.

    I guess I was one of the last people to experience some of this, in some places that were the last holdouts to give it up. My job used to consist of "writing ad hoc applications to process data for people in the company and help them automate their work away." My university taught us UNIX. Life was good.

    At least I can teach it to my kids some day.

    You can bet if I ever start a company it'll look like what you've described. But to do that I'll have to figure out how to do something useful enough to build a profitable company around.

    --
    J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
    • I'm not this pessimistic.

      People abandoned mainframe accounts because they wanted to be able to change their desktop backgrounds. Or their prompt. Or whatever they wanted. And you had to jump through hoops to get the high priests to do anything like that.

      Personal computers grew because people like to be able to change whatever they want, install the programs they want, and so on.

      People don't shun community. Look no further than (shudder) myspace for that.

      Moving to 'personal' computers in a business envir
      --
      Beware the Jabberw0k, my son!