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NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • Is it just me, or are "how often does a business upgrade?", and "how often are new versions released?" often completely unrelated in many corporate environments. If you have brittle code that uses deprecated features, you probably aren't even going to consider installing the latest and greatest whenever it comes out.

    If perl is releasing every quarter or annually, all the people that are running 5.005 aren't going to care and are going to continue to running 5.005. Those people aren't going to upgrade u
    • If you have brittle code that uses deprecated features, you probably aren't even going to consider installing the latest and greatest whenever it comes out.

      Exactly.

      Those people aren't going to upgrade until [they] HAVE to.

      Exactly. Where are they getting support now? Not from p5p nor from the CPAN, and likely not from any core contributor. I completely fail to understand that mindset that it is the responsibility of anyone who wants to contribute a patch to the Perl core or upload a module to the CPAN

      • > Where are they getting support now?

        In the case of where I'm working now (medium-large corporate) we don't get to choose our Perl version anyway.

        Perl is an integral part of the underlying OS (RedHat) and while we may layer our own /opt/cpan modules on top of that, we are bound by that.

        One of the recent bugs in RedHat that they fixed was due to us invoking our support contract with them and having them fix the bug, because we needed it.

        I imagine a lot of other people are in the same situation. I'd have f

        • Perl is an integral part of the underlying OS ([Red Hat]) and while we may layer our own /opt/cpan modules on top of that, we are bound by that.

          Red Hat's FTE: 2200.

          Perl 5's FTE: still 0.

          If Red Hat wants to support Perl 5.6.x, that's Red Hat's business. I still fail to see how that obligates p5p to support Perl 5.6.x.

          • They aren't supporting 5.6, they're supporting 5.8.8.

            But by your timeline there could easily be things in 5.8.8 that have been deprecated by now.