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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • It's not artificial demand. They have no control over demand, short of advertising trying to increase interest. They do have complete control over the supply curve, however.
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    xoa

    • I'm being, eh...what's the word I'm looking for? Stupid, I guess.

      Based on the notion that rarity controls demand to some degree, and that DeBeers completely controls effective rarity because of their supply control, I feel it's easier to cut out the middleword and say that DeBeers controls demand. I realize it's not complete control, but I feel it's control nonetheless.

      I suppose "artificial demand" is a poor phrase, though. Consider it fixed.

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      You are what you think.
      • What you're calling "demand" is not demand from an economics point of view. It's "market price". Demand is strictly "the amount of a good that consumers are willing and able to buy at a given price."

        The supplier of a good can't control demand, only supply. I might be trying to sell my used Kleenex, and I can artificially limit supply (only selling one per day, even though I could sell at least ten per day), but that doesn't mean that there's more demand.

        All that DeBeers is affecting by controlling s

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        xoa

        • IANAE, so the definition of the word within that notion wasn't something I was aware of.

          Now that I've admitted my ignorance -- doesn't demand increase with rarity? I mean, commonsensically it would seem so, but perhaps this is one of those things that economists know better than I about. (Like, say, economic stuff.)

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          You are what you think.
          • I'm no economist, either, but I did take a semester each of Microeconomics and Macroeconomics over the past two years. My understanding of "demand" matched yours exactly, and it took a while. If you look at some of the class notes pages, or any intro econ textbook, the graphs may help. I know they did for me.
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            xoa

            • ...I did take a semester each of Microeconomics and Macroeconomics...
              My advisor is interested in economics first, computer science second, so he pushed the economics classes big time when they were open for me one semester. I didn't take his advice -- he also recommended I take a class on COBOL.

              I'll have to look it over. I'm curious what the formal definition of demand is, now... :\

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              You are what you think.
        • I would argue that tobacco companies create demand by selling an addictive product.