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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • Good for you, Adam! I've found that as long as you are conscious of energy consumption, it's not too hard to reduce bit-by-bit.

    A few of my personal choices:
      * Own one car for 6 of us, including my in-laws
      * Compact fluorescent bulbs everywhere
      * Bike to work as often as possible
      * Bus when biking is not feasible
      * Subscribe to a local farm for produce
      * Pay $5/month wind energy subsidy to power company
      * Unplug rarely-used electronics (e.g. VCR)
      * Buy
    • by Alias (5735) on 2006.10.11 21:08 (#50972) Homepage Journal
      Well, I'm afraid I'm not going to be able to go quite as far as you guys... :)

      Because I'm in an apartment, I can't really compost or air-dry clothing (since the latter is against the rules, no hanging of clothing outside) and the farm thing is out (central city location).

      The apartment comes with flurescent lights already (not normal lightbulb shape).

      And the appliances are new, but it was the only reasonable choice in this particular situation.

      As usual, I'm just trying to keep things in mind, while making it as easy as possible for me to do good. I already have enough things to do, and if I had to remember to do anything regularly, I know I'd just forget.

      Add to that if I can fix at least the obvious things, and then generally try to do the right thing if given easy enough options to, then I'm working WITH human nature and encouraging upstream providers to make the greener options easier.

      I wonder if the used-goods thing might be something of a false economy though.

      Things wear out eventually, and get disposed of.

      If you ammortise the environment cost of used appliances over the lifetime of the appliance, then purchasing used goods doesn't fully offset the need to buy new goods.

      On the other hand, I DID try to buy new things with very long warranty periods. I figure that this encourages the manufacturers to build in higher levels of permanence, and reduces the environment overhead on an ammortized per-year basis.

      Not to mention also making it cheaper for me.