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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • I don't actually write the Changes file directly from git, but I find this command rather helpful when preparing a new release:

    git --no-pager log --no-merges --pretty=format:' %x20%x20 - %s (%an)' `git tag | tail -n 1`..

    Which prints the summary of all changes since the last release (= last git tag). In fact I added this (and a few variations) to my .gitconfig, like this:

    [alias]
            lastchanges =!git --no-pager log --no-merges --pretty=format:' %x20%x20 - %s (%an)' `git tag | tail

    • Nifty stuff, thanks!

      After reading your comment, I wrote a simple script to convert the `git --no-pager log --no-merges` to a well structured Changes file. The only problem was that you can't figure the version of the file each time. However, if one will add a check in the script to see when a certain file's $VERSION had changed, one would be able to output a well structured Changes file from git history. Sounds like an idea for a module, really. Maybe I'll sit and write it some day.

      For some reason the formatting didn't work for me, and I'm not using any tags yet, but it's really cool to learn new things. I didn't know about --no-merges and --no-pager. Thanks again.