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NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • "Do we care about Perl 5, or are all eyes on Rakudo?"

    Do we care about a language that runs important infrastructure in practically every large company on earth? Hell yes. I wrote some of that. Do we care about a language that is not yet ready for production? Maybe. Well, a little at least because there's a small bunch of people doing impressive amounts of design and implementation work.

    *My* future wrt. Perl dialects is with Perl 5. That's not going to change for another ten years at least.

    Steffen (who is pa

  • I am about ready to move all my future Perl development to Perl 6. (Except perhaps very short scripts tied to heavy-duty non-ported CPAN modules.) On the other hand, I am likely to keep on using my already written Perl 5 scripts for another decade or more -- unless Perl 5 changes so much I am forced to do major modifications on them, in which case I will probably just port them to Perl 6 and be done with it.
  • A propos the "people today who don't know Perl has OO" - once this perception is formed it is difficult to remove it. When you show those people OO in Perl they would say - OK - but this is just what every other modern language has, this is nothing special and they forget about what you shown and next day they still believe Perl has no OO. But there still there is a way to change it - you need to show them something that is not just what every other language has - something extraordinary - like Roles. I
  • Do we care about Perl 5, or are all eyes on Rakudo?

    I care only for Perl5, and most of what I have to say about Perl6, or Rakudo, is not welcomed by the much vocal Perl6 groupies, hence I usually stay quiet when they blog about it. But then again, it feels like I am lightyears away from them anyway, with my requirements for stability and reliability, and with my core software upgrade cycles anyway, so the only thing Perl5 and Perl6 have in common is the prefix of four letters to their name.

    • I know this was a while ago, but I feel it requires a response.

      Do we care about Perl 5, or are all eyes on Rakudo?

      I care only for Perl5,

      Really? Do you care about Perl 5's given operator or smart matching? Do you think those are "Perl 5 constructs?" Do you really need to care?

      most of what I have to say about Perl6, or Rakudo, is not welcomed by the much vocal Perl6 groupies, hence I usually stay quiet when they blog about it. But then again, it feels like I am lightyears away from them anyway, with my requirements for stability and reliability,

      Users of Perl 4 (and I was among them) said exactly the same thing about this crazy Perl 5 thing that was going to add an object system and make data structures far too complicated to support in the "real world."

      the only thing Perl5 and Perl6 have in common is the prefix of four letters to their name.

      Hmmm... no. There are a plethora of features of Perl 5 that remain in exactly the same form in P

      --
      Yet Another Just another perl hacker, // essays.ajs.com
  • I'm still very much interesting in promoting Perl 5. I don't see Perl 6 impacting my business for at least five years.

    I'm very interested in getting involved in this project. Let's get together in Lisbon and discuss it.

  • I think most people, including me, are going to "Marketing Campaign" and think that means spending money on advertising.

    It doesn't have to.

    I, personally, think there's a lot of value in just doing the survey part. Just knowing which issues are hurting us the most makes it easier for us to fix the right problems.

    Imagine what would happen if we did a "Try Perl at perl.com" or "Try Perl at perl.org" today? If we were to spend a hypothetical million dollars on Magazine, TV and Radio, would we actually be in any

    • Marketing could mean money, but it doesn't have to. Frankly, most Perl people aren't marketing people, so we really don't know what's involved, but something as silly as putting up a "I'm Java/I'm Perl" videos on Youtube might take off. Lots of marketing seems to be throwing lots of stuff at the wall and seeing what sticks. I'm quite happy for us to try and figure out marketing which doesn't cost money, but I also don't think that spending money for long term gain would necessarily be bad. It would just

      • I've been thinking about what we could do as programmers to help the marketing side of things and I think I have an idea. Lots of people come into a new language because they want to hack on some system/program written in that language and the cooler and "prettier" the app, the more people that use it and want to hack on it.

        So I think the best thing that us programmers can do for Perl's image (5 & 6) is to write some killer programs. Not cool CPAN modules (which are only visible inside our little bubble

        • We’d also need real designers doing real design

          This precise utterance is actually the reason why Perl applications don’t have good design.

          I appear to be one of few Perl programmers who have any direct appreciation (if not particularly great skill) at design. In contrast, both PHP and Rails are infested with these people. I have seen reams of postings about typography out of the Ruby people I follow, f.ex., and not a single thing about it from a Perl person, if memory serves.

          And that means whate

  • The question is not "Is p5p willing to add new features to Perl 5?". That's simplistic.

    One question is "Is someone willing to implement a new feature some people want?"

    Another question is "Is someone willing to shepherd such a patch through the inevitable arguments on p5p?"

    A very good question is "Is some pumpking willing to commit such a patch?"

    An excellent question is "When will that patch be available in a stable and supported release?"

    There are many answers to these questions. In my opinion, they all

  • Glad to see this conversation happening. Much needed. I would propose that part of the perception problem isn't going to be entirely solved by "marketing" alone; the whole Perl community needs to pitch in to take on some public image improvements. Phillip.
    --
    Keeping technology simple since 2003