Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments
NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

use Perl Log In

Log In

[ Create a new account ]

vsergu (505)

vsergu
  (email not shown publicly)

Journal of vsergu (505)

Wednesday March 10, 2004
12:13 AM

Innumeracy

[ #17839 ]

My latest bank statement included an ad that starts like this:

Do you know where your time goes? For instance, in an average lifetime we spend...

  • 6 months just sitting at traffic lights
  • 8 months opening junk mail
  • 12 months looking for lost possessions
  • 5 years just waiting in line

Assuming an average lifespan of 72 years, that means that during an average day (including childhood and old age), a person would have to spend

  • 10 minutes sitting at traffic lights
  • 13 minutes opening junk mail
  • 20 minutes looking for lost possessions
  • 100 minutes waiting in line

Now, the first might be believable, depending on where the person lives, but the second and third are clearly too high, and the last is completely insane. Do ad copywriters not have calculators, or do they lead lives very different from ours?

The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
 Full
 Abbreviated
 Hidden
More | Login | Reply
Loading... please wait.
  • 100 minutes waiting in line

    If I were you, I would consider writing a letter to bank stating I would choose another one's services, since their lines seem to be too long... :-)

    • I used to work in a bank. Once I suggested we put a clock on the wall (reading the time on the wacked out terminal was a little difficult). The manager rejected the suggestion - "we don't want people to know how long they've been standing in line."
      --
      -derby
      • That a common objection everywhere. Gambling halls, restaurants, and anywhere else that you might get upset about waiting will refuse to post the time.

        I worked in a cinema, and I always that that objection was crap: people want to know how late they are!
        --
        rjbs