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schwern (1528)

schwern
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Schwern can destroy CPAN at his whim.

Journal of schwern (1528)

Friday March 21, 2003
08:34 PM

Coming back from deep orbit

[ #11161 ]

After many months of self-repair work and generally enjoying life in Portland, its time to bring some code up to date. Especially with the impending release of 5.8.1, MakeMaker, Test::More and Test::Harness all need releases. To anyone with VMS knowledge, I need my Compaq TestDrive account re-Unixified.

I'm currently switching development from CVS to Aegis which will cause some short-term disruption. Conversion of my repositories was easy, but brane retooling might take longer.

Time to make Jarkko's life miserable again.

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  • I'm currently switching development from CVS to Aegis

    Why did you choose Aegis over other version control systems? For example, what does it have or do better than CVS? And why is it better or more suittable than (say) subversion? I've had a quick google, but I can't spot any good online articles comparing the merits of the various source control systems, and which provide more than just source control.

    • From what I know (not being an Aegis user), the big functional plus of Aegis vs the rest of the world (except BitKeeper) is support for distributed repositories. However I don't see how it's a benefit for project where only one or two people have commit access.

      Moreover, from Aegis webpage, I see that Aegis enforces a development process which requires that change sets "work" before they may be integrated into the project baseline. That's attractive for QA people. (It's possible to do something similar with

    • I got sick of CVS. Subversion isn't quite ready yet. I've used Aegis in the past and liked it.

      As far as being a superior version control system:

      . Sensible branching. In fact, you're almost always working in a branch.
      . Change sets (it even figured out change sets when I dumped my CVS repository into it)
      . Free (as opposed to Perforce, say)
      . Old and Stable (in a good way)
      . Sensible cross-branch integration. ie. I can easily clone individual changes from one branch
          to another.
      . Easily develo