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runrig (3385)

runrig
  dougwNO@SPAMcpan.org

Just another perl hacker somewhere near Disneyland

I have this homenode [perlmonks.org] of little consequence on Perl Monks [perlmonks.org] that you probably have no interest in whatsoever.

I also have some modules [cpan.org] on CPAN [cpan.org] some of which are marginally [cpan.org] more [cpan.org] useful [cpan.org] than others.

Journal of runrig (3385)

Tuesday June 15, 2004
12:33 AM

Will They or Won't They

[ #19253 ]

I think whatever magazine I happen to pick up, there's bound to be one or two articles at least slightly interesting. And so it was when I read a Family Circle article titled "Can Your Child Be Drafted?"

And for the first time, young women as well as men can expect to be called...our troops are spread too thinly...dramatically reduced recruitment and reenlistment levels...The No Child Left Behind Act, signed by President Bush, includes a provision that if secondary schools fail to release the names, addresses and phone numbers of students to military recruiters, they will lose their Federal funding.

Yep, it was in Family Circle. Along with recipes, and diet, decorating, beauty and fashion tips. Sorry, no actual link to the article, dead tree version only. But I did see this bumper sticker the other day:

Anyone but Bush in 2004

Update: The best link I could find relating to this

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  • I decided to check on this and here it is:

    SEC. 9528. ARMED FORCES RECRUITER ACCESS TO STUDENTS AND STUDENT RECRUITING INFORMATION.

                  (1) ACCESS TO STUDENT RECRUITING INFORMATION- Notwithstanding section 444(a)(5)(B) of the General Education Provisions Act and except as provided in paragraph (2), each local educational agency receiving assistance under this Act shall provide, on a request made by military recruiters or an institution of higher education, acces
    • Item 2 (CONSENT) gives us parents an out

      It certainly seems to. I bet they are relying on ignorance of item 2, both on the part of parents and school administrators (I was ignorant of it myself until now, thanks). When my kids hit high school, I'll make sure the school is aware of item 2 (and my written request).

    • Since when does recruiting = drafting?

      The sky is falling.
      --
      Rob Hill rhill@thisbox.com
      • But there were other parts of the article that mentioned possibly drafting if recruitment goes down significantly, which explains the article title.
        • A draft has always been a possibility. By law all males must register for selective service upon turning 18. This is nothing new.
          --
          Rob Hill rhill@thisbox.com
          • A draft has always been a possibility.
            What's your point? Many things are possible. Factors which affect the likelyhood of things are a concern to some people. Maybe they're not a concern to you. In which case, nothing to see here, move along.
            • Factors which affect the likelyhood of things are a concern to some people

              Or so-called experts discussing the likelyhood of things is of interest to some people (when Senator so-and-so says it's likely, it means alot more than when you or I say it's possible but I don't have the article handy anymore, so I won't try to quote). I think it's interesting that the act that I mentioned in the first place would probably increase recruitment and make a draft less likely. Which might be considered a good thing.

              • I can understand your reasoning, the only place we differ is: I don't consider it a bad thing to look to schools for recruiting. The military is not a place you want just a bunch of guys with guns. There's some high tech things going on and some serious training. I remember in high school I took the ASVAB test to see how I could be best used if I chose to join the military. Service to your country is not a bad thing. And many people choose to go into the military straight out of high school to get money fo
                --
                Rob Hill rhill@thisbox.com
                • Maybe where we differ is how they look to schools for recruiting. I'm not against serving (I almost did it myself), and I'm not against them showing up for career day and handing out info or getting people to sign up and ask for more info, or giving schools the info for the kids to look at when the kids are looking for career/college info. I'm just against having my kids info being handed to recruiters without my explicit permission (and slightly miffed that I have to expend the effort to revoke the implici
                  • Now I agree with your reasoning there, I don't mind them coming to the school and passing out information, but having the school give the info to the military for a dossier is kinda... wierd. We pay those taxes, we shouldn't have to give them marketing info for that money. I still don't think this is leading us any closer to a draft which was my main comment. I had not thought about the privacy issue. My wife and I are home-schooling our kids, so I guess I won't have to worry about it. If the gov't wants
                    --
                    Rob Hill rhill@thisbox.com
    • The link I added at the top suggests sending a certified letter to the school district headquarters and a copy to the school principal.