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rjbs (4671)

rjbs
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I'm a Perl coder living in Bethlehem, PA and working Philadelphia. I'm a philosopher and theologan by training, but I was shocked to learn upon my graduation that these skills don't have many associated careers. Now I write code.

Journal of rjbs (4671)

Sunday May 11, 2008
09:41 PM

planned presentation digressions

[ #36386 ]

Here's an idea that occurs to me frequently when making slides for conference tutorials. Sometimes I make a slide and I know that it might be too advanced, but it's a crap shoot. If the vast majority of the audience understands the slide, I can save several slides by not explaining it. If enough people look confused, I want to display those slides. I don't mind making the slides up front, but I'd like to be able to only show them if I think it's needed.

I wonder if there's some way to make good Keynote triggers that would let me say something like: "if you want to explain why 1 + 1 = 1, press F1; otherwise, press Next."

Choose your own slideshow.

I also wonder whether the Visor program that I saw ages ago is triggerable during a slide show. It looks good, and it would be convenient to keep a giant-font terminal ready to slide down to demonstrate answers to hard questions.

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  • I wonder if there's some way to make good Keynote triggers that would let me say something like: "if you want to explain why 1 + 1 = 1, press F1; otherwise, press Next."

    I do "choose your own slideshow" all the time. My presentations are mostly project status type stuff, and if I don't know exactly who is going to be in the room for the presentation, I'll include slides that have technical detail that I can skip over if the audience is not very technical (or doesn't seem interested in the detail.)

    The