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quidity (1296)

quidity
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http://the.earth.li/~alex/
Jabber: quidity@jabber.earth.li

A relapsing reformed physicist.

Journal of quidity (1296)

Monday September 23, 2002
03:27 PM

Run! You can run...

[ #7947 ]

There are some pieces of music that I cannot ever just listen to once. Whenever they come on the radio I instantly find the CD they live on and play the track again. There's even one that could stand being put on repeat all the day long, not to mention half of the night. I speak of nothing other than Crossroads, the greatest piece of blues rock ever to flee the guitar of the ever fantastic Eric Clapton.

I'm tempted to have a funeral now, as I'm damm sure this song will receive its fair share of playings when my passing is celebrated

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  • I think you're slightly confused. Crossroads is a fantastic song, but the definitive version is by Robert Johnson [stormloader.com] (who wrote it).

    Of course the mark of a great song is that even Clapton finds it impossible to do a bad version :)

    • Testify Brother!

      It really is amazing how many modern "blues" comes from the 1920's, 1930's and 1940's, especially from the Delta Blues.

      I have few blues cd's but I do have the compilation of most of Robert Johnson's works, "King of the Delta Blues Singers". Simply excellent. Heck, I think I'll fire it up right now!
    • Well, I went and brought a Robert Johnson CD, and it's very good. Thanks for the tip.

      I still prefer the Cream version though... but many of the other tracks he originated are better than the covers I've heard before, as it were.

    • Not that it is better, but Phil Keaggy also does a mean version of it.