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Journal of nicholas (3034)

Sunday November 05, 2006
04:33 PM

Morbid

[ #31517 ]

Mmm. Wikipedia has a list of rail accidents in the United Kingdom. I've only stumbled on this because the BBC told me that the Hither Green rail crash happened "on this day" (in 1967). (The relevance being that I pass the location daily on the way to work, and then the location of the 1957 Lewisham rail crash)

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  • For more morbidity, they have a list sorted by death toll [wikipedia.org] too. Notice that with typical wikipedia consistency, one of them is British crashes and one is UK crashes, although as far as I can tell the "UK" list doesn't contain any in that ghastly little province that we don't really want.
    • Mmm. I think that the "British" list is mistitled, because:

      • Armagh [wikipedia.org], 12 June [wikipedia.org] 1889 [wikipedia.org]; 78 killed, 170 injured

      is definately in Northern Ireland

      As Wikipedia notes, this accident led to the Regulation of Railways Act 1889 [wikipedia.org], which my father says is still in force. He also says that this act made it illegal to lock the doors of carriages while in use (something that Wikipedia doesn't note), which in turn is "interesting" given how the Health and Safety Executive seem to mandate that all trains are to have centr

    • I found this about a month ago, during a discussion with Penguin on the safety of Dutch trains versus UK trains.

      There was also a nice listing of all historic train accidents, which I found rather interesting, because it reveals how people felt about engineering then (rather similar to how many companies view software development these days).