Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments
NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

use Perl Log In

Log In

[ Create a new account ]

n1vux (1492)

n1vux
  (email not shown publicly)
http://boston.pm ... x.cgi?BillRicker
AOL IM: n1vux (Add Buddy, Send Message)
Yahoo! ID: n1vux (Add User, Send Message)

Only started with Perl4 and Perl5 in 1995. I was doing AWK etc for 12 years before that, and resisted switching. I've been doing OO since before C++ hit bigtime, with Objective-C and SmallTalk, so I really like the (no longer new) Perl5 OO style; and the Lispish Map style is also an old friend. What do I hack with Perl? All data that passes my way; systems monitoring scripts at $DayJob, weather data at night, and I cheat on NPR word puzzles. Member: Boston.pm.org [pm.org] BLU.org [blu.org] /. LinkedIn [linkedin.com]

N1VUX is my FCC-issued ham radio callsign.

Journal of n1vux (1492)

Saturday December 09, 2006
02:28 PM

<XML2006>

[ #31869 ]

My excuse for lack of contributions to the Perl Advent Calendar this last week was I was apparently one of the few attendees at <XML2006> not live-blogging, including several folks from O'Reilly. In spite of the O'Reilly presense, I didn't see or hear much Perl there. One speaker does much of his work in Perl; another has done a couple modules, but Java and Dot-Net appeared to be dominant platforms in discussion.

I returned not so much knowing more, but more aware of what more there is to learn.

My choice of note-taking being paper booklets and a fountain pen may be retro-tech, but my reasons for limiting online time to a bit of Zaurus email checking has more to do with laptops not having Ergo keyboards. Pleasantly, the hotel supplied note paper was in jacket-pocket shaped booklets. I filled an average of one a day with spider scribble.

Since I am dealing with WebService and Service Oriented Architecture issues at $DayJob, I spent much of my time in the Enterprise XML track, but sampled Hands-on XML and XML on the Web as appropriate, especially if "Lessons Learned" or "Best Practices" appeared in the short description. I missed all the good typography and layout talks in the Documents & Publishing track since it's not related to $DayJob, although I'd have personally enjoyed lots of that and the Web2.0 mashups on the Web track.

Suddenly, I feel in a state of sin for typing this inside layout tags instead of semantic tags!

As I glean nuggets of interest from my notes, and my notes-to-self to google more details on many things heard in passing, I'll try to blog them here.

The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
 Full
 Abbreviated
 Hidden
More | Login | Reply
Loading... please wait.