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merlyn (47)

merlyn
  merlyn@stonehenge.com
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PAUSE-ID: MERLYN [cpan.org].
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Journal of merlyn (47)

Friday March 03, 2006
08:29 AM

Why do newscasters always ... pause?

[ #28859 ]
Why do field radio and TV newscasters invariably... pause before delivering the last few words of their delivery? Was this originally some sort of signal to the studio that they were done, similar to "over" in pilot communications? Who started it? Why do they still do it? Can you tell it annoys me? :-)

"For my use.perl journal... I'm Randal Schwartz."

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  • I suspect it's a tradition that started with Edward R. Murrow. He used to start his UK broadcasts with "This ... is London". Since then, others have picked up on it. Whenever I catch CNN, I hear James Earl Jones saying "This ... is CNN".

    So I guess it might be an today's journalists secretly saying "I wish I was real journalist, like Murrow".

  • I figured that the pause was similar to a broken cadence in music. You expect a chord to resolve, but it doesn't, so it holds your attention.