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lachoy (1663)

lachoy
  chris.winters@gmail.com
http://www.cwinters.com/

I am actually Chris Winters; I am actually living in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA; I am actually married and have three cats. (Guess what one of them is named?) I am the "OpenInteract" guy, which could be good or bad.

Journal of lachoy (1663)

Monday April 29, 2002
11:36 PM

Spreading the word

[ #4552 ]

Perl is great at code generation, I says.

I've determined that I'm going to try and be methodical about drawing diagrams better. Start simple, know what you're trying to say, don't be afraid to wad up the paper and start again.

I've also determined that I'm going to try and cook more often. (I cook far more than my wife.) Having pizza should be an admission of defeat! Yesterday I made a spinach paneer except with tofu instead of the cheese normally used. Very good, and this time I didn't make it bitingly spicy. Tonight was burritos with garbanzo beans whipped up in the food processor with the usual spices and thrown in with some sauteed onions, ginger and red peppers. Add to that some pressed yogurt (forgot to get sour cream) in a tortilla with usual trimmings and you've got yum!

Bugged the DBD::InterBase list about not being able to open two statements on a single handle. This throws a monkey wrench into previously mentioned plans unless I implement that plan to filter security in SPOPS using a join rather than serially...

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  • Every software engineering course/text I've had preaches the "picture is worth 1000 words" principle. I believe it, but I've never had a course or a book teach me anything useful about diagramming. We've got wonderful standards like UML and such, but I can't use them because the examples always teach me how to use UML to define an elevator or a zoo instead of how to define a program. I've learned three to five diagramming standards that I cannot use at work because while I can read the diagrams, I have n

    --
    J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
    • I've learned three to five diagramming standards that I cannot use at work because while I can read the diagrams, I have no clue how to use the diagramming conventions to represent even the simplest one-off tool programs I write.

      This is one of the problems with current diagramming techniques IMO. They actually work somewhat in reverse. More complicated programs are more easily represented than less complicated ones. Whereas a one-off tool would probably not have more than a class or two (and more-often
      • To rephrase, I've learned three to five diagramming standards that I cannot use at work because I have no clue how to use the diagramming conventions to represent even the simplest one-off tool programs I write, let alone a large program. The problem is I don't know how to use these diagramming conventions to represent a program. I know how to use them to represent a giraffe or an elevator or an automobile. In the book you see an example like this, in class the professor goes over the same example, then

        --
        J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
    • I agree entirely about not being taught diagramming. It's something that is just assumed you can pick up by osmosis. Maybe it's just that most people can pick up up with the Carnegie Hall principle ("practice, practice, practice!"). I have a bad tendency to read books I should be using as a workbook -- for instance UML Distilled [amazon.com] is said to be an excellent introduction. I've found UML to be verbose, but there are probably shortcuts, and I don't think there's a requirement (enforced by the UML Cops) that you

      • I agree entirely about not being taught diagramming

        Me too, for that matter.

        I've found UML to be verbose, but there are probably shortcuts, and I don't think there's a requirement (enforced by the UML Cops) that you use all of it...

        I never use all of it. Just enough to do just-enough-design. For me its being able to dump the structures you have to build up in your head into offline storage quickly, without having to write code to do it. And of course its nice when someone says "how does that work?"