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jesse (2531)

jesse
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+ -

  News: Perl 5.12.1 now available on 2010.05.18 10:52

Posted by jesse on 2010.05.18 10:52
Releases

"Now suppose," chortled Dr. Breed, enjoying himself, "that there were many possible ways in which water could crystallize, could freeze. Suppose that the sort of ice we skate upon and put into highballs what we might call ice-oneis only one of several types of ice. Suppose water always froze as ice-one on Earth because it had never had a seed to teach it how to form ice-two, ice-three, ice-four ... And suppose," he rapped on his desk with his old hand again, "that there were one form, which we will call ice-ninea crystal as hard as this deskwith a melting point of, let us say, one-hundred degrees Fahrenheit, or, better still, a melting point of one-hundred- and-thirty degrees."

                                                                           -- Kurt Vonnegut, Cat's Cradle

It gives me great pleasure to announce Perl 5.12.1, the second stable release of Perl 5.12.

You can download Perl 5.12.1 from your favorite CPAN mirror or from: http://search.cpan.org/~jesse/perl-5.12.1/

SHA1 digests for this release are: 75a8a17cec15d68c6bb959b0aa9879d2ded6f90d perl-5.12.1.tar.bz2 83b99f08379782dc06594a85eeb279edc5b0ca44 perl-5.12.1.tar.gz

This release contains minor bug fixes and updates of several core modules, as well as minor documentation updates. It should be fully backward compatible with Perl 5.12.0.

Perl 5.12.1 is a recommended upgrade for all users of Perl 5.12.

You can find a full list of changes in the file "perl5121delta.pod" located in the "pod" directory inside the release and on the web at: http://search.cpan.org/~jesse/perl-5.12.1/pod/perl5121delta.pod

Perl 5.12.1 represents approximately four weeks of development since Perl 5.12.0 and contains approximately 4,000 lines of changes across 142 files from 28 authors.

Perl continues to flourish into its third decade thanks to a vibrant community of users and developers. The following people are known to have contributed the improvements that became Perl 5.12.1:

Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason, Chris Williams, chromatic, Craig A. Berry, David Golden, Father Chrysostomos, Florian Ragwitz, Frank Wiegand, Gene Sullivan, Goro Fuji, H.Merijn Brand, James E Keenan, Jan Dubois, Jesse Vincent, Josh ben Jore, Karl Williamson, Leon Brocard, Michael Schwern, Nga Tang Chan, Nicholas Clark, Niko Tyni, Philippe Bruhat, Rafael Garcia-Suarez, Ricardo Signes, Steffen Mueller, Todd Rinaldo, Vincent Pit and Zefram.

We expect to release Perl 5.12.2 in mid-August 2010, followed by Perl 5.12.3 in mid-November. The next major release of Perl 5, 5.14.0 should appear in spring 2011.

Read More 2 comments
Comments: 2
+ -

  Perl 5.12.1 now available[->] on 2010.05.18 10:31 jesse

Submitted by jesse on 2010.05.18 10:31
Releases

"Now suppose," chortled Dr. Breed, enjoying himself, "that there were many possible ways in which water could crystallize, could freeze. Suppose that the sort of ice we skate upon and put into highballs what we might call ice-oneis only one of several types of ice. Suppose water always froze as ice-one on Earth because it had never had a seed to teach it how to form ice-two, ice-three, ice-four ... And suppose," he rapped on his desk with his old hand again, "that there were one form, which we will call ice-ninea crystal as hard as this deskwith a melting point of, let us say, one-hundred degrees Fahrenheit, or, better still, a melting point of one-hundred- and-thirty degrees."

-- Kurt Vonnegut, Cat's Cradle

It gives me great pleasure to announce Perl 5.12.1, the second stable release of Perl 5.12.

You can download Perl 5.12.1 from your favorite CPAN mirror or from: http://search.cpan.org/~jesse/perl-5.12.1/

SHA1 digests for this release are: 75a8a17cec15d68c6bb959b0aa9879d2ded6f90d perl-5.12.1.tar.bz2 83b99f08379782dc06594a85eeb279edc5b0ca44 perl-5.12.1.tar.gz

This release contains minor bug fixes and updates of several core modules, as well as minor documentation updates. It should be fully backward compatible with Perl 5.12.0.

Perl 5.12.1 is a recommended upgrade for all users of Perl 5.12.

You can find a full list of changes in the file "perl5121delta.pod" located in the "pod" directory inside the release and on the web at: http://search.cpan.org/~jesse/perl-5.12.1/pod/perl5121delta.pod

Perl 5.12.1 represents approximately four weeks of development since Perl 5.12.0 and contains approximately 4,000 lines of changes across 142 files from 28 authors.

Perl continues to flourish into its third decade thanks to a vibrant community of users and developers. The following people are known to have contributed the improvements that became Perl 5.12.1:

Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason, Chris Williams, chromatic, Craig A. Berry, David Golden, Father Chrysostomos, Florian Ragwitz, Frank Wiegand, Gene Sullivan, Goro Fuji, H.Merijn Brand, James E Keenan, Jan Dubois, Jesse Vincent, Josh ben Jore, Karl Williamson, Leon Brocard, Michael Schwern, Nga Tang Chan, Nicholas Clark, Niko Tyni, Philippe Bruhat, Rafael Garcia-Suarez, Ricardo Signes, Steffen Mueller, Todd Rinaldo, Vincent Pit and Zefram.

We expect to release Perl 5.12.2 in mid-August 2010, followed by Perl 5.12.3 in mid-November. The next major release of Perl 5, 5.14.0 should appear in spring 2011.
Link To Original Source

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+ -

  News: Perl 5.11.3 now available on 2009.12.22 14:29

Posted by jesse on 2009.12.22 14:29
Releases
jesse writes ""Say I'm going in a swimming, I am. Don't you wish you could? But of
    course you'd druther work wouldn't you? Course you would!"

    Tom contemplated the boy a bit, and said: "What do you call work?"

    "Why ain't that work?"

    Tom resumed his whitewashing, and answered carelessly: "Well, maybe it
    is, and maybe it aint. All I know, is, it suits Tom Sawyer."

    "Oh come, now, you don't mean to let on that you like it?"

    The brush continued to move. "Like it? Well I don't see why I oughtn't
    to like it. Does a boy get a chance to whitewash a fence every day?"

    That put the thing in a new light. Ben stopped nibbling his apple. Tom
    swept his brush daintily back and forth stepped back to note the effect
    added a touch here and there-criticised the effect again Ben
    watching every move and getting more and more interested, more and more
    absorbed. Presently he said: "Say, Tom, let me whitewash a little."

                                        Mark Twain, /The Adventures of Tom Sawyer/

It gives me great pleasure to announce the release of Perl 5.11.3.

This is the fourth DEVELOPMENT release in the 5.11.x series leading to a
stable release of Perl 5.12.0. You can find a list of high-profile changes
in this release in the file "perl5113delta.pod" inside the distribution.

Perl 5.11.3 is, hopefully, the last release of Perl 5.11.x before
code freeze for Perl 5.12.0. At that point, we will only make changes
which fix regressions from previous released versions of Perl or which
resolve issues we believe would make a stable release of Perl 5.12.0
inadvisable.

You can (or will shortly be able to) download the 5.11.3 release from:

        http://search.cpan.org/~jesse/perl-5.11.3/

The release's SHA1 signatures are:

MD5: 0051020f8ae2a89c9d624e01ed56b02c perl-5.11.3.tar.bz2
SHA1: 7fe87005437002f0b515d983429d0bfba36398ac perl-5.11.3.tar.bz2

This release corresponds to commit 9c3f2640bc in Perl's git repository.
It is tagged as 'v5.11.3'.

We welcome your feedback on this release. If you discover issues
with Perl 5.11.3, please use the 'perlbug' tool included in this
distribution to report them. If Perl 5.11.3 works well for you, please
use the 'perlthanks' tool included with this distribution to tell the
all-volunteer development team how much you appreciate their work.

If you write software in Perl, it is particularly important that you test
your software against development releases. While we strive to maintain
source compatibility with prior stable versions of Perl wherever possible,
it is always possible that a well-intentioned change can have unexpected
consequences. If you spot a change in a development version which breaks
your code, it's much more likely that we will be able to fix it before the
next stable release. If you only test your code against stable releases
of Perl, it may not be possible to undo a backwards-incompatible change
which breaks your code.

Perl 5.11.3 represents approximately one month of development since
Perl 5.11.2 and contains 61407 lines of changes across 396 files
from 40 authors and committers:

Abigail, Alex Davies, Alexandr Ciornii, Andrew Rodland, Andy
Dougherty, Bram, brian d foy, Chip Salzenberg, Chris Williams, Craig
A. Berry, Daniel Frederick Crisman, David Golden, Dennis Kaarsemaker,
Eric Brine, Father Chrysostomos, Gene Sullivan, Gerard Goossen, H.
Merijn Brand, Hugo van der Sanden, Jan Dubois, Jerry D. Hedden,
Jesse Vincent, Jim Cromie, Karl Williamson, Leon Brocard, Max
Maischein, Michael Breen, Moritz Lenz, Nicholas Clark, Rafael
Garcia-Suarez, Reini Urban, Ricardo Signes, Stepan Kasal, Steve
Hay, Steve Peters, Tim Bunce, Tony Cook, Vincent Pit and Zefram.

Many of the changes included in this version originated in the CPAN
modules included in Perl's core. We're grateful to the entire CPAN
community for helping Perl to flourish.

Notable changes in this release:

* Perl is shipped with Unicode version 5.2, itself released in October
    2009.

* Perl can now handle every Unicode character property.

* The experimental 'legacy' pragma, introduced with Perl 5.11.2 has been
    removed. Its functionality has been replaced with the 'feature' pragma.

* Numerous CPAN "toolchain" modules have been updated to what we hope
    are the final release versions for Perl 5.12.0.

* Many crashing bugs or regressions from earlier releases of Perl were fixed
    for this release.

Development versions of Perl are released monthly on or about the 20th
of the month by a monthly "release manager". You can expect following
upcoming releases:

  January 20 Ricardo Signes
  February 20 Steve Hay
  March 20 Ask Bjørn Hansen"
Read More 0 comments

+ -

  Perl 5.11.3 now available on 2009.12.22 14:08 jesse

Submitted by jesse on 2009.12.22 14:08
Releases
"Say — I'm going in a swimming, I am. Don't you wish you could? But of
    course you'd druther work — wouldn't you? Course you would!"

    Tom contemplated the boy a bit, and said: "What do you call work?"

    "Why ain't that work?"

    Tom resumed his whitewashing, and answered carelessly: "Well, maybe it
    is, and maybe it aint. All I know, is, it suits Tom Sawyer."

    "Oh come, now, you don't mean to let on that you like it?"

    The brush continued to move. "Like it? Well I don't see why I oughtn't
    to like it. Does a boy get a chance to whitewash a fence every day?"

    That put the thing in a new light. Ben stopped nibbling his apple. Tom
    swept his brush daintily back and forth — stepped back to note the effect
    — added a touch here and there-criticised the effect again — Ben
    watching every move and getting more and more interested, more and more
    absorbed. Presently he said: "Say, Tom, let me whitewash a little."

                                        — Mark Twain, /The Adventures of Tom Sawyer/

It gives me great pleasure to announce the release of Perl 5.11.3.

This is the fourth DEVELOPMENT release in the 5.11.x series leading to a
stable release of Perl 5.12.0. You can find a list of high-profile changes
in this release in the file "perl5113delta.pod" inside the distribution.

Perl 5.11.3 is, hopefully, the last release of Perl 5.11.x before
code freeze for Perl 5.12.0. At that point, we will only make changes
which fix regressions from previous released versions of Perl or which
resolve issues we believe would make a stable release of Perl 5.12.0
inadvisable.

You can (or will shortly be able to) download the 5.11.3 release from:

        http://search.cpan.org/~jesse/perl-5.11.3/

The release's SHA1 signatures are:

MD5: 0051020f8ae2a89c9d624e01ed56b02c perl-5.11.3.tar.bz2
SHA1: 7fe87005437002f0b515d983429d0bfba36398ac perl-5.11.3.tar.bz2

[IMPORTANT: Due to an entirely preventable error on my part, a
  corrupted, truncated perl-5.11.3.tar.gz entered the PAUSE. Until
  its deletion propagates through CPAN, please be sure you're getting
  perl-5.11.3.tar.bz2, not perl-5.11.3.tar.gz. Sorry about that!]

This release corresponds to commit 9c3f2640bc in Perl's git repository.
It is tagged as 'v5.11.3'.

We welcome your feedback on this release. If you discover issues
with Perl 5.11.3, please use the 'perlbug' tool included in this
distribution to report them. If Perl 5.11.3 works well for you, please
use the 'perlthanks' tool included with this distribution to tell the
all-volunteer development team how much you appreciate their work.

If you write software in Perl, it is particularly important that you test
your software against development releases. While we strive to maintain
source compatibility with prior stable versions of Perl wherever possible,
it is always possible that a well-intentioned change can have unexpected
consequences. If you spot a change in a development version which breaks
your code, it's much more likely that we will be able to fix it before the
next stable release. If you only test your code against stable releases
of Perl, it may not be possible to undo a backwards-incompatible change
which breaks your code.

Perl 5.11.3 represents approximately one month of development since
Perl 5.11.2 and contains 61407 lines of changes across 396 files
from 40 authors and committers:

Abigail, Alex Davies, Alexandr Ciornii, Andrew Rodland, Andy
Dougherty, Bram, brian d foy, Chip Salzenberg, Chris Williams, Craig
A. Berry, Daniel Frederick Crisman, David Golden, Dennis Kaarsemaker,
Eric Brine, Father Chrysostomos, Gene Sullivan, Gerard Goossen, H.
Merijn Brand, Hugo van der Sanden, Jan Dubois, Jerry D. Hedden,
Jesse Vincent, Jim Cromie, Karl Williamson, Leon Brocard, Max
Maischein, Michael Breen, Moritz Lenz, Nicholas Clark, Rafael
Garcia-Suarez, Reini Urban, Ricardo Signes, Stepan Kasal, Steve
Hay, Steve Peters, Tim Bunce, Tony Cook, Vincent Pit and Zefram.

Many of the changes included in this version originated in the CPAN
modules included in Perl's core. We're grateful to the entire CPAN
community for helping Perl to flourish.

Notable changes in this release:

* Perl is shipped with Unicode version 5.2, itself released in October
    2009.

* Perl can now handle every Unicode character property.

* The experimental 'legacy' pragma, introduced with Perl 5.11.2 has been
    removed. Its functionality has been replaced with the 'feature' pragma.

* Numerous CPAN "toolchain" modules have been updated to what we hope
    are the final release versions for Perl 5.12.0.

* Many crashing bugs or regressions from earlier releases of Perl were fixed
    for this release.

Development versions of Perl are released monthly on or about the 20th
of the month by a monthly "release manager". You can expect following
upcoming releases:

  January 20 — Ricardo Signes
  February 20 — Steve Hay
  March 20 — Ask Bjørn Hansen
Read More 0 comments

+ -

  Perl 5.11.2 on 2009.11.23 9:52

Posted by jesse on 2009.11.23 9:52
Releases

acme writes:

  The streets were pretty quiet, which was nice. They're always quiet here
  at that time: you have to be wearing a black jacket to be out on the
  streets between seven and nine in the evening, and not many people in the
  area have black jackets. It's just one of those things. I currently live
  in Colour Neighbourhood, which is for people who are heavily into colour.
  All the streets and buildings are set for instant colourmatch: as you
  walk down the road they change hue to offset whatever you're wearing.
  When the streets are busy it's kind of intense, and anyone prone to
  epileptic seizures isn't allowed to live in the Neighbourhood, however
  much they're into colour.
                 - Michael Marshall Smith, "Only Forward"

It gives me great pleasure to announce the release of Perl 5.11.2.

This is the third DEVELOPMENT release in the 5.11.x series leading to a stable release of Perl 5.12.0. You can find a list of high-profile changes in this release in the file "perl5112delta.pod" inside the distribution.

You can download the 5.11.2 release from:

   http://search.cpan.org/~lbrocard/perl-5.11.2/

The release's SHA1 signatures are:

   2988906609ab7eb00453615e420e47ec410e0077  perl-5.11.2.tar.gz

   0014442fdd0492444e1102e1a80089b6a4649682  perl-5.11.2.tar.bz2

Read More 0 comments

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  Rakudo Perl 6 development release #23 ( on 2009.11.23 9:51

Posted by jesse on 2009.11.23 9:51
Perl 6

Announce: Rakudo Perl 6 development release #23 ("Lisbon")

On behalf of the Rakudo development team, I'm pleased to announce the
November 2009 development release of Rakudo Perl #23 "Lisbon".
Rakudo is an implementation of Perl 6 on the Parrot Virtual Machine
(see http://www.parrot.org). The tarball for the November 2009 release
is available from http://github.com/rakudo/rakudo/downloads

Due to the continued rapid pace of Rakudo development and the frequent
addition of new Perl 6 features and bugfixes, we recommend building Rakudo
from the latest source, available from the main repository at github.
More details are available at http://rakudo.org/how-to-get-rakudo.

Rakudo Perl follows a monthly release cycle, with each release code
named after a Perl Mongers group. The November 2009 release is code
named "Lisbon" for Lisbon.pm, who did a marvellous job arranging this
year's YAPC::EU.

Shortly after the October 2009 (#22) release, the Rakudo team
began a new branch of Rakudo development ("ng") that refactors
the grammar to much more closely align with STD.pm as well as
update some core features that have been difficult to achieve
in the master branch [1, 2]. Most of our effort for the past month
has been in this new branch, but as of the release date the new
version had not sufficiently progressed to be the release copy.
We expect to have the new version in place in the December 2009 release.

This release of Rakudo requires Parrot 1.8.0. One must still
perform "make install" in the Rakudo directory before the "perl6"
executable will run anywhere other than the Rakudo build directory.
For the latest information on building and using Rakudo Perl, see the
readme file section titled "Building and invoking Rakudo".

Some of the specific changes and improvements occuring with this
release include:

* Rakudo is now passing 32,753 spectests, an increase of 171 passing
    tests since the October 2009 release. With this release Rakudo is
    now passing 85.5% of the available spectest suite.

* As mentioned above, most development effort for Rakudo in November
    has taken place in the "ng" branch, and will likely be reflected
    in the December 2009 release.

* Rakudo now supports unpacking of arrays, hashes and objects in
    signatures

* Rakudo has been updated to use Parrot's new internal calling conventions,
    resulting in a slight performance increase.

The development team thanks all of our contributors and sponsors for
making Rakudo Perl possible. If you would like to contribute,
see http://rakudo.org/how-to-help , ask on the perl6-compiler@perl.org
mailing list, or ask on IRC #perl6 on freenode.

The next release of Rakudo (#24) is scheduled for December 17, 2009.
A list of the other planned release dates and codenames for 2009 is
available in the "docs/release_guide.pod" file. In general, Rakudo
development releases are scheduled to occur two days after each
Parrot monthly release. Parrot releases the third Tuesday of each month.

Have fun!

[1] http://use.perl.org/~pmichaud/journal/39779
[2] http://use.perl.org/~pmichaud/journal/39874

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+ -

  News: Perl 5.11.1 on 2009.10.21 9:56

Posted by jesse on 2009.10.21 9:56
Releases

Milo had been caught red-handed in the act of plundering his countrymen, and, as a result, his stock had never been higher. He proved good as his word when a rawboned major from Minnesota curled his lip in rebellious disavowal and demanded his share of the syndicate Milo kept saying everybody owned. Milo met the challenge by writing the words "A Share" on the nearest scrap of paper and handing it away with a virtuous disdain that won the envy and admiration of almost everyone who knew him. His glory was at a peak, and Colonel Cathcart, who knew and admired his war record, was astonished by the deferential humility with which Milo presented himself at Group Headquarters and made his fantastic appeal for more hazardous assignment.

- Joseph Heller, Catch-22

It gives me great pleasure to announce the release of Perl 5.11.1.

This is the second DEVELOPMENT release in the 5.11.x series leading to a stable release of Perl 5.12.0. You can find a list of high-profile changes in this release in the file "perl5111delta.pod" inside the distribution.

You can (or will shortly be able to) download the 5.11.1 release from:

http://search.cpan.org/~jesse/perl-5.11.1/

Read More 0 comments

+ -

  Meeting Announcements: Madrid Perl Mongers Social Meeting on 2009.10.21 9:55

Posted by jesse on 2009.10.21 9:55
Events
salva writes "The Madrid Perl Mongers are having a social meeting on Wednesday October 21 from 19:30 (localtime) at El Rincon Guay, Embajadores 62, Lavapies, Madrid.

Everybody is invited!

Just come and enjoy some "cañas y pinchos" with us while we talk about Perl!"
Read More 0 comments

+ -

  Perl 5.11.1[->] on 2009.10.20 14:56 jesse

Submitted by jesse on 2009.10.20 14:56
Releases

Milo had been caught red-handed in the act of plundering his countrymen, and, as a result, his stock had never been higher. He proved good as his word when a rawboned major from Minnesota curled his lip in rebellious disavowal and demanded his share of the syndicate Milo kept saying everybody owned. Milo met the challenge by writing the words "A Share" on the nearest scrap of paper and handing it away with a virtuous disdain that won the envy and admiration of almost everyone who knew him. His glory was at a peak, and Colonel Cathcart, who knew and admired his war record, was astonished by the deferential humility with which Milo presented himself at Group Headquarters and made his fantastic appeal for more hazardous assignment.

- Joseph Heller, Catch-22 

 



It gives me great pleasure to announce the release of Perl 5.11.1.

This is the second DEVELOPMENT release in the 5.11.x series leading to a stable release of Perl 5.12.0. You can find a list of high-profile changes in this release in the file "perl5111delta.pod" inside the distribution.

You can (or will shortly be able to) download the 5.11.1 release from:

http://search.cpan.org/~jesse/perl-5.11.1/

The release's SHA1 signatures are:

4eb796d28849ea21466166cea0b580d98163564f  perl-5.11.1.tar.bz2

aa4ca3b0cffa1bbcbcdb09e81c6ece759112ce14  perl-5.11.1.tar.gz

We welcome your feedback on this release. If you discover issues with Perl 5.11.1, please use the 'perlbug' tool included in this distribution to report them. If Perl 5.11.1 works well for you, please use the 'perlthanks' tool included with this distribution to tell the all-volunteer development team how much you appreciate their work.

If you write software in Perl, it is particularly important that you test your software against development releases. While we strive to maintain source compatibility with prior stable versions of Perl wherever possible, it is always possible that a well-intentioned change can have unexpected consequences. If you spot a change in a development version which breaks your code, it's much more likely that we will be able to fix it before the next stable release. If you only test your code against stable releases of Perl, it may not be possible to undo a backwards-incompatible change which breaks your code.

In the release announcement for 5.11.0, I asked readers to test the new version of Perl with their in-house applications and CPAN modules.  Among other things, that testing turned up previously undiscovered issues in a change to Perl's Regular Expression semantics which we were able to defang in time for 5.11.1.

\Notable changes in this release:

  • Package declarations can now include a version number. 
  • suidperl is no longer available as part of perl. If your code depends on suidperl, you need to find an alternate solution. (This was actually true as of 5.11.0)
  • Over the years a number of language constructs and interpreter features have been deprecated and will eventually be removed. As of this release, Perl enables deprecation warnings by default.
  • Perl's tests are now aware of (and work around) a bug in Mac OS X 10.6 locales.
  • Support for Windows 95, 98, ME and NT4 has officially ended. 

This release represents approximately 3 weeks development since Perl 5.11.0, containing 22,000 lines of changes across 396 files from 26 authors and committers:

Abigail, Alex Vandiver, brian d foy, Chris Williams, Craig A. Berry, David Fifield, David Golden, demerphq, Eric Brine, Geoffrey T. Dairiki, George Greer, H.Merijn Brand, Jan Dubois, Jerry D. Hedden, Jesse Vincent, Josh ben Jore, Max Maischein, Nicholas Clark, Rafael Garcia-Suarez, Simon Schubert, Sisyphus, Smylers, Steve Hay, Steve Peters, Vincent Pit and Yves Orton.

Many of the changes included in this version originated in the CPAN modules included in Perl's core. We're grateful to the entire CPAN community for helping Perl to flourish.




Yves Orton will release Perl 5.11.2 on November 20, 2009.

Leon Brocard will release Perl 5.11.3 on December 20, 2009.

Ricardo Signes will release Perl 5.11.4 on January 20, 2010.
Link To Original Source

Read More 0 comments

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  Perl 5.11.0 now available on 2009.10.05 9:35

Posted by jesse on 2009.10.05 9:35
Releases
jesse writes "Whispers of an "evil power" were heard in lines at dairy
        shops, in streetcars, stores, arguments, kitchens, suburban
        and long-distance trains, at stations large and small,
        in dachas and on beaches. Needless to say, truly mature
        and cultured people did not tell these stories about an
        evil power's visit to the capital. In fact, they even
        made fun of them and tried to talk sense into those who
        told them. Nevertheless, facts are facts, as they say,
        and cannot simply be dismissed without explanation:
        somebody had visited the capital. The charred cinders
        of Griboyedov alone, and many other things besides,
        confirmed it. Cultured people shared the point of view
        of the investigating team: it was the work of a gang of
        hypnotists and ventriloquists magnificently skilled in
        their art.
                        M. Bulgakov, The Master and Margarita


It gives me great pleasure to announce the release of Perl 5.11.0.

Perl 5.11.0 is a DEVELOPMENT release. We're making it available to you today to make it easy for you to test your software on what will eventually become Perl 5.12.

This release is the result of over two years of development by a global community of developers.
Read More 2 comments
Comments: 2
+ -

  yapc: YAPC::Brasil 2009 on 2009.10.05 9:34

Posted by jesse on 2009.10.05 9:34
yapc
nuba writes "We are proud to announce the YAPC::Brasil 2009, to be held from 30/October to 1/November in Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

We have humble goals this year: to put forth the greatest YAPC::Brasil ever, celebrate the Joy of Perl among ourselves, and tempt everyone else to join us in developing the programming language that has the happiest users!

We hope to deliver expertise in all levels, from introductory workshops {say "hello Perl!"} to perlguts, SMOP, Reaction and Metaprogramming to list a few and also a good number of slots for lightning talks to encourage newcomers!

Niterói holds one of the highest Human Development Indexes (HDI) of the country, and stays just a 15-minute ferry boat ride away from the famous, infamous and glamorous Rio de Janeiro. If you happen to be nearby, hop aboard and come join us!

More information:
http://yapcbrasil.org.br/2009
http://twitter.com/yapcbrasil #yapcbrasil09
organizacao@yapcbrasil.org.br"
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  Perl 5.11.0 now available[->] on 2009.10.05 9:12 jesse

Submitted by jesse on 2009.10.05 9:12
Releases
Whispers of an "evil power" were heard in lines at dairy
        shops, in streetcars, stores, arguments, kitchens, suburban
        and long-distance trains, at stations large and small,
        in dachas and on beaches. Needless to say, truly mature
        and cultured people did not tell these stories about an
        evil power's visit to the capital. In fact, they even
        made fun of them and tried to talk sense into those who
        told them. Nevertheless, facts are facts, as they say,
        and cannot simply be dismissed without explanation:
        somebody had visited the capital. The charred cinders
        of Griboyedov alone, and many other things besides,
        confirmed it. Cultured people shared the point of view
        of the investigating team: it was the work of a gang of
        hypnotists and ventriloquists magnificently skilled in
        their art.
                        — M. Bulgakov, The Master and Margarita

It gives me great pleasure to announce the release of Perl 5.11.0.

Perl 5.11.0 is a DEVELOPMENT release. We're making it available to you today to make it easy for you to test your software on what will eventually become Perl 5.12.

This release is the result of over two years of development by a global community of developers. You can find a list of high-profile changes in this release in the file "perl5110delta.pod" inside the release.

You can download the 5.11.0 tarball from: http://search.cpan.org/~jesse/perl-5.11.0/

The release's SHA1 signatures are:

  0d436577386c668161e3dad385d233c383bf4c9d perl-5.11.0.tar.bz2
  3137486cfe00094d1cd9a00e6e61f152f8fdb26e perl-5.11.0.tar.gz

We welcome your feedback on this release. If you discover issues with Perl 5.11.0, please use the 'perlbug' tool included in this distribution to report them. If Perl 5.11.0 works well for you, please use the 'perlthanks' tool included with this distribution to tell the all-volunteer development team how much you appreciate their work.

If you write software in Perl, it is particularly important that you test your software against development releases. While we strive to maintain source compatibility with prior releases wherever possible, it is always possible that a well-intentioned change can have unexpected consequences. If you spot a change in a development release which breaks your code, it's much more likely that we will be able to fix it before the next stable release. If you only test your code against stable releases of Perl, it may not be possible to undo a backwards-incompatible change which breaks your code.

Today marks a major change in how we'll be releasing development versions of Perl.

Historically, a single individual, the Perl "pumpking" has been personally responsible for all aspects of the Perl development process — ranging from direction setting, dispute resolution and deep hacking to mentoring, patch application and release engineering.

Over the years, we've been blessed with a series of extraordinary leaders. These hackers have eschewed fame, fortune and many nights' sleep for the good Perl.

To help ensure that we don't burn out our best diplomats and brightest coders, our release process is changing. I have recruited the first few volunteer release managers. Each month, on the 20th, the next release engineer in rotation will cut a new development release.

Today's release of 5.11.0 is a transitional release to test our release machinery and process. The schedule for the near future is as follows:

        2009
        ====

        October 2 — 5.11.0 — Jesse Vincent
        October 20 — 5.11.1 — Jesse Vincent
        November 20- 5.11.2 — Yves Orton
        December 20- 5.11.3 — Leon Brocard

        2010
        ====

        January 20 — 5.11.4 — Ricardo Signes

If you're interested in volunteering to join the release-engineer rotation, please contact me off-list and I'll add you to our talent pool. It's not a particularly lucrative job — The only perks are your name in perlhist, the chance to choose the epigram for a release announcement and the warm feeling you get from bringing a new version of Perl into the world.

Best,

Jesse
Link To Original Source
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  Comment: Re:It is I (Score 1) on 2009.08.20 23:20

by jesse on 2009.08.20 23:20 (#70206)
Attached to: What was the fate of Fotango?
Making me personally the maintainer for all the modules released by staff at my company is...very not right. Often, I have nothing to do with the modules other than that I pay the wonderful perl hackers who produce them. I've been procrastinating getting a 'BPS' or 'BESTPRACTICAL' PAUSE account for the company, but it (or some other affordance) that allows collective maintainership by me and my coworkers really needs to happen.
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Comments: 8
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  Comment: HTTP::Server::Simple (Score 1) on 2009.08.17 0:07

I could really use more test reports from Win32 on the latest dev builds. KMX has something that works for him, but I neither use nor know a whole lot about Win32, so I really need the Win32 crowd to step up to help make this work. (Ironically, it's not HTTP::Server::Simple that's not been happy on Win32, but its test suite.)
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Comments: 22
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  Comment: Can you publish the dependency chains? (Score 1) on 2009.02.13 17:06

by jesse on 2009.02.13 17:06 (#67342)
Attached to: Announcing the "CPANTS Heavy 100" index
I have some equivalent tools that crawl the packages themselves. I just ran my dependency chain tool for MojoMojo and come up with 239 deps rather than your 266. I'd be very curious to see what the discrepancy is.
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Comments: 6