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jdavidb (1361)

jdavidb
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http://voiceofjohn.blogspot.com/

J. David Blackstone has a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science and Engineering and nine years of experience at a wireless telecommunications company, where he learned Perl and never looked back. J. David has an advantage in that he works really hard, he has a passion for writing good software, and he knows many of the world's best Perl programmers.
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  • That article is transparently wrong on several arguments.

    When he brings up endangered species, he fails to consider keys issues:

    1. Wild cows and thoroughbred horses barely exist anymore. The specimen that do exist are effectively organic machines: their contribution of these species to the ecosphere is human-mediated. But it is this contribution of a species to an ecosphere that matters, not the existence of the species as a whole.

    2. A narrow range of species are useful to humans so they have been domest

    • Please excuse the fractured grammar in some of the sentences. I edited a bit too much, a bit too sloppily.

    • But industry couldn’t be trusted to avert the extinction of species *that had no market value*.

      A deeper criticism along the same lines might ask "Do there exist valuable entities and ideas which reject our ability to attach market prices?" Of course, that's an attack on strict utilitarianism which will start long debates. Good luck avoiding relativism then!

      The premise of using market value to achieve similar goals does have some appeal, however.